Category Archives: 408 sqn news

408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron deploys in support of Operation Impact

  • A line of people wearing uniforms or civilian clothing and carrying luggage board an aircraft.
 News Article / April 18, 2017

From National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces

About 60 members of 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, based at 3rd Canadian Division Support Base in Edmonton, Alberta, departed on April 17, 2017, for northern Iraq. There, they will assume the duties of the Tactical Aviation Detachment of Air Task Force–Iraq as part of Operation Impact, the Canadian Armed Forces’ commitment to the fight against Daesh.

“The Royal Canadian Air Force is proud to be part of the Canadian Armed Forces’ contribution to the ongoing fight against Daesh,” said Major-General Christian Drouin, 1 Canadian Air Division commander. “We provide air power that integrates with and supports our Canadian Armed Forces and coalition partners. The tactical helicopter detachment is a crucial component of this commitment. 430 Squadron has done a tremendous job over the past few months, maintaining a level of excellence that I know 408 Squadron will continue.”

Members of 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron will relieve personnel from 430e Escadron tactique d’hélicoptères, from Valcartier, Quebec, who have been providing tactical aviation support in northern Iraq since early October 2016. Personnel of 408 Squadron will fly and maintain four CH-146 Griffon helicopters, located with the Canadian-led Coalition Role 2 medical facility at Camp Érable, Iraq.

“As part of the fight against Daesh, 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron has deployed a contingent of men and women to provide in-theatre tactical transport in northern Iraq,” said Squadron commanding officer Lieutenant-Colonel Trevor Teller. “I am proud of the commitment, readiness and professionalism of our airmen and airwomen, and am certain that they will provide the same level of excellence in the conduct of their mission as this squadron has done throughout its rich and operationally focused history.”

As many as four CH-146 Griffon helicopters provide in-theatre tactical transport for Canadian troops and materiel near Erbil, Iraq. The aircraft carry an array of self-defence systems for force protection.

“The men and women of 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron will continue to provide the reliable and dedicated service that Canada’s Special Operations Forces and our coalition allies have come to expect from the RCAF,” said Colonel Jeannot Boucher, Commander 1 Wing, Kingston, Ontario. “As they deploy to support the fight against Daesh, I am confident that they will live up to their squadron motto, ‘For Freedom’.”

Passing of Mother Goose

RAYNER, Henrietta May “Molly”mother goose 1 mother goose2

Peacefully at Brampton Civic Hospital on December10, 2015 at the age of 96. Loving wife of the late Don. Will be sadly missed by two daughters and her extended family in Ontario, Quebec, Australia and Wales. During World War II, Molly cooked for and was known as “Mother Goose” to the 408 Squadron

Private family services have will be held. Interment at St. Elias Cemetery

Please visit the Book of Memories at www.wardfuneralhome.com

Avro Lancaster KB882 Found a New Home

As Warbirds News reported back in February  the combat veteran Avro Lancaster KB882 which has long been on outside display in Edmundston, New Brunswick was set to move to a new home. The local town council, which owns the former RCAF bomber, had come to the sad conclusion that they no longer had the means to care for the rare aircraft in its deteriorating state, and decided they had to pass the torch to another group, even if that meant that KB882 had to leave its home in the maritimes. The small team of volunteers which has been doing their best to maintain the aircraft, despite the adverse conditions, fielded about twenty proposals from other organizations seeking to take on the aircraft, and presented the Edmundston City Council with the four which they felt were the best. The City Council has now made their choice, and announced on 18 March that the Lancaster will be heading to the Alberta Aviation Museum in Edmonton, Alberta.

“While it saddens us that she must go, we are pleased to have found a safe home for KB882. This Lancaster has an impressive story to tell and we firmly believe the Alberta Aviation Museum will be able to give her a voice,” says Mychèle Poitras, chairwoman of the Society for the Preservation of the Edmundston Lancaster.

Lech Lebiedowski, the Alberta Aviation Museum’s curator sees the immensity of the importance that the Lancaster has in Canadian aviation history as well as to his museum. “KB882 is indeed a time capsule preserved intact for over half a century,” he said. “In many ways it is a curator’s dream coming true. It will also be one of the most exciting restoration projects we have ever undertaken.” The Alberta Aviation Museum will now set about moving the aircraft to its new home and commencing its restoration, something which they plan on rigorously documenting in a way which also celebrates Edmundston’s half century role in its history. “We are honoured to have been chosen to receive this important artifact from the people of Edmundston,” says Tom Sand, President of the Alberta Aviation Museum Association. “It shows the high regard for our museum and its track record of preserving and telling the important stories of aviation in this country.”

KB882 flew eleven bombing missions against German forces during WWII and returned to Canada to continue service in the post-war Royal Canadian Air Force. KB882 then received modifications, alongside other RCAF Lancasters, upgrading to the SHORAN radar which enabled Canada to map its Arctic territory in only nine years. KB882 is the only remaining Lancaster still in its aerial mapping configuration. The aircraft also has a strong connection to Edmonton, Alberta having flown some of its arctic survey missions from the province’s capitol. 408 Squadron, in which KB882 served, also has ties with the city, having moved there in 1971. It still operates from the Edmonton Garrison, flying the CH-146 Griffon helicopter, a derivative of the Bell UH-1.

The storm clouds gather over KB882 as the Edmundston City Council decides her fate. (Credits: Benoit de Mulder, via Warbirdsnews)
The storm clouds gather over KB882 as the Edmundston City Council decides her fate. (Credits: Benoit de Mulder, via Warbirdsnews)

The Alberta Aviation Museum should be a good fit for KB882. The museum is based at Edmonton’s Blatchford Field, a historic site once home to the pioneer bush pilots, and later an important site for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan during WWII and later as a hub for arctic exploration. The museum occupies the only remaining double-wide, double long hangar built for the BCATP, which is itself a designated historic building. The Alberta Aviation Museum has a great deal of experience in aircraft restoration as well, having completed ground-up rebuilds on several important airframes, including a B-25 Mitchell, a de Havilland Mosquito and two Noorduyn Norseman. KB882 seems therefore to have found a great new home.

408 Squadron officer wins Ironman World Championship military division

408 Squadron officer wins Ironman World Championship military division

 News Article / January 14, 2015

Major Joel Maley is the squadron aircraft maintenance and engineering officer at 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron (THS) at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Edmonton, Alberta.

He has competed at the Ironman World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, USA, for three consecutive years. 2014, however, will go down as the most memorable because he won the military division in the first year that the Championship opened the military division to countries other than the United States.

“This is the icing on the cake for me,” Major Maley said during an interview with Global News. “Physical fitness is very important in the military, and leading by example is important for an officer.

“I’ve been very fortunate to have a supportive wife,” he added. “If you don’t have a supportive wife then there’s no point in going.” He thinks, however, that it is time to “take a step back from Ironman. We’re expecting our fourth child in April.”

By Major Joel Maley

The Ironman World Championship in Hawaii has long been considered the most prestigious long-course triathlon in the world – it was the birthplace of the Ironman. You can enter this prestigious event in only two ways: by qualifying at another Ironman race or via a lottery. For anyone unfamiliar with an Ironman, it consists of a 3.8-kilometre swim, a 180-kilometre cycle, and a 42.2-kilometre run.

In May 2014, I traveled with my family to The Woodlands, in Texas, to compete at the May 17 Ironman Texas. On that day, I set a new personal best of 1:05 for the swim and a new Ironman personal best of 9:05. My performance was good enough for 24th overall (in a field of 2000+ athletes), fourth amateur, and second in the Male 30–34 age division. Perhaps more importantly, my second-place finish in my age group secured a slot at the Ironman World Championship.

After qualifying to the World Championship, I received sponsorship for the championship through the Personnel Support Programs office at CFB Edmonton and the National Sports Office in Ottawa, Ontario.

My family and I travelled to Hawaii eight days before the race. Doing so provided me an opportunity to get used to the heat and to scout out the course. The week before the race is always packed with various activities, such as the parade of nations, package pick-up, the athlete banquet and a mandatory pre-race meeting. It’s easy to be distracted and not get enough rest.

The day of the event starts early. The professional men and women started at 6:30 and 6:35 a.m. respectively; the male age groupers hit the water at 6:50 a.m. while the female age groupers start at 7:00 a.m. for the infamous mass start that launches almost every Ironman race. I’m normally a middle-of-the-pack swimmer and that’s where I ended up in the 3.8 kilometre swim – I finished it in an hour and 10 minutes.

The 180-kilometre bike ride is the second portion. The World Championship is always a tough Ironman because you are forced to deal with the scorching heat and the brutal and unceasing winds of the Big Island. The ride was particularly difficult this year due to the strong winds, but I completed it in five hours and seven minutes. I felt great coming off the bike and knew I had a shot at a new course personal best.

I settled into an easy pace in the marathon and got through the first half in just over an hour and 30 minutes.

Despite some cloud cover, it was still an inferno. I felt as if I was overheating; the only relief from the heat was the ice and water that waited at each aid station. The Energy Lab [the turnaround point in the run] was a completely different beast. The run in was fine, but I knew I was hitting my limits. Everything was starting to tighten up.

I finally caught up to Brad Williams, a retired United States Air Force non-commissioned member, and was just about to settle in to run with him when he said something along the lines of: “Congrats – the military championship is yours.” We shook hands and then he said, “Go get it.”

So that is precisely what I did. My finish time was nine hours and 30 minutes; I finished 138th overall, in the top 100 amateurs, and 25th in Male 30–34 age division. But perhaps most importantly, I finished first in the military division.

I owe a special word of thanks to 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, CFB Edmonton and the National Sports Office for supporting me on this challenging journey.

Story and photos courtesy of The Western Sentinel, the newspaper of 3rd Canadian Division.

408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron crew rescues seriously injured hiker

By RCAF public affairs

Members of Edmonton-based 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron (THS) rescued a seriously injured hiker near Cline River Heliport on Monday, September 22, at approximately 3:45 p.m. MDT.

A Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CH-146 Griffon helicopter from 408 THS was conducting a Landing Zone (LZ) reconnaissance flight in support of the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Basic Mountain Operations Course when it received a radio request from the nearby Cline River Heliport to assist a seriously injured hiker.

Responding to a life-threatening situation, the Griffon landed in challenging terrain while the first officer and flight engineer assisted with carrying the hiker by stretcher over rugged ground to the waiting helicopter. The Griffon crew then conducted a medical evacuation flight to Rocky Mountain House Health Centre where they were met by staff who had been alerted to their arrival. The hiker was left conscious and under hospital care.

“The aircraft commander acted decisively and took the appropriate action to preserve life in this situation. We’re certainly glad we were able to assist, said Lieutenant-Colonel Rod MacDonnell, the commanding officer of 408 THS. “While we are not primarily a search and rescue squadron, this incident shows the flexibility of air power and that all RCAF aircraft can add to the search and rescue role to assist Canadians in need of our help.”

408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron practices interoperability with local health authority

News Release / August 27, 2014

The aircrew of a CH-146 Griffon Helicopter from 408 Tactical Squadron take time to get a group photo with staff from the local hospital in Trail British Columbia as part of Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014 on 22 Aug, 2014.

The aircrew of a CH-146 Griffon Helicopter from 408 Tactical Squadron take time to get a group photo with staff from the local hospital in Trail British Columbia as part of Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014 on 22 Aug, 2014.

 

Trail, BC – A CH-146 Griffon helicopter landed and practiced patient transfer operations at the Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital in Trail, British Columbia, on August 22, 2014. Four Griffon helicopters are supporting Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014, a training exercise involving roughly 400 Reserve Force soldiers from 39 Canadian Brigade Group from August 18-28, 2014.

Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014 is a culmination of training that has gone on throughout the year, and confirms soldiers’ skills and readiness to respond to domestic emergencies or international operations.

Quick Facts

  • The practice transfer ensured interoperability between the Canadian Armed Forces personnel training in the area and the Interior Health Authority in the case of an injury requiring helicopter transfer during Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014.
  • 39 Canadian Brigade Group (39 CBG) consists of 11 army reserve units representing communities throughout the province. The part-time soldiers of 39 CBG live and work in the communities they serve in.
  • Providing realistic training is the goal of all training events. During Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014, soldiers will be using blank and simulated ammunition, as well as live ammunition on a range that is off limits and away from the public domain.
  • The area around Trail, BC, was selected to host the exercise as it provides a unique and challenging terrain for 39 CBG soldiers. This environment requires leaders and soldiers to navigate and operate in a realistic setting.

Quotes

This was an outstanding opportunity to work with the local health authority and ensure we’re on the same page. We’re making sure we’re doing everything possible to support 39 Canadian Brigade Group as they undergo this important training.

Major Luc Vermette, CH-146 Griffon Pilot

It’s rare to have a chance like this, to have a dry run before the real thing happens. Different organizations have different processes, for example, something as simple as whether you wait for the helicopter to completely shut down before starting the patient transfer. Ultimately we want what’s best for the patients, whomever they may be.

Lisa Keech, RN, ER Patient Care Coordinator

 

CH-146 Griffon helicopters in Trail area for Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014

kootenaycougarA CH-146 Griffon helicopter landed and practiced patient transfer operations at the Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital in Trail, British Columbia, on August 22, 2014. Four Griffon helicopters are supporting Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014, a training exercise involving roughly 400 Reserve Force soldiers from 39 Canadian Brigade Group from August 18-28, 2014.

Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014 is a culmination of training that has gone on throughout the year, and confirms soldiers’ skills and readiness to respond to domestic emergencies or international operations.

“It’s rare to have a chance like this, to have a dry run before the real thing happens,” said Lisa Keech, RN, ER Patient Care Coordinator. “Different organizations have different processes, for example, something as simple as whether you wait for the helicopter to completely shut down before starting the patient transfer. Ultimately we want what’s best for the patients, whomever they may be.”

Quick Facts:

The practice transfer ensured interoperability between the Canadian Armed Forces personnel training in the area and the Interior Health Authority in the case of an injury requiring helicopter transfer during Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014.

39 Canadian Brigade Group (39 CBG) consists of 11 army reserve units representing communities throughout the province. The part-time soldiers of 39 CBG live and work in the communities they serve in.

Providing realistic training is the goal of all training events. During Exercise KOOTENAY COUGAR 2014, soldiers will be using blank and simulated ammunition, as well as live ammunition on a range that is off limits and away from the public domain.

The area around Trail, BC, was selected to host the exercise as it provides a unique and challenging terrain for 39 CBG soldiers. This environment requires leaders and soldiers to navigate and operate in a realistic setting.

“This was an outstanding opportunity to work with the local health authority and ensure we’re on the same page,” said Major Luc Vermette, CH-146 Griffon Pilot. “We’re making sure we’re doing everything possible to support 39 Canadian Brigade Group as they undergo this important training.”

408 Squadron’s Last Casualties of WW2

408 Squadron’s Last Casualties of WW2 and The Final Flight of EQ-U Lancaster Mk X KB993

18 May 1945

RAF Station Linton-on Ouse

Michael Cecil Cameron (W.Op / Air Gunner). This picture was taken in Canada before he joined 408 Squadron.
Michael Cecil Cameron (W.Op / Air Gunner).

The war in Europe had ended 10 days before and life at 408 Squadron was good.  With only 4 weeks remaining until the Squadron redeployed to Canada, the wartime alert levels had been stood down and daily operations took on a training and maintenance role.  While the air war against Germany was over, 408 Squadron was one of eight squadrons selected for redeployment to the Pacific Theater of Operations and the continued fight against Japan. The squadron had begun conversion to the Avro Lancaster X from their Handley Page Halifax VII bombers and 40 Squadron was devoting most of its time to flight and ground training.

 

In the early evening, Flying Officer Anthony Clifford and his crew were in the circuit practicing

WO2 Cameron in front of a Halifax VII.
WO2 Cameron
WO2 Cameron (right) and his crew in front of a Halifax VII.  While the crew is not named, it is suspected that these are the members of the Clifford Crew during their Heavy Bomber Conversion. Most crews stayed paired throughout training and deployment
WO2 Cameron (right) and his crew in front of a Halifax VII.

 

At 2210 hours, EQ-U was observed flying into the hillside of James’s Thorn above Ashton Clough in Derbyshire.  All six of the crew perished in the crash, making them the last 408 Squadron casualties of the Second World War.

13. Memorial to the RCAF Crew of KB993 during its unveiling on 18 May 1995.
Memorial to the RCAF Crew of KB993

Memorial to the RCAF Crew of KB993

On 18 May 1995, on the 50th anniversary of the crash, a memorial to KB993 and its crew was unveiled at the crash site.  Two men from the Glossop are, Paul Booth and Stephen Lewis were the driving force behind the memorial.  It also has a plaque commemorating the crash of a USAAF C-47 Skytrain a few meters away from the same site on 24 July 1947, claiming the entire crew. The ceremony was attended by Mrs. Marion Clifford, the 91 year old mother of Flying Officer Clifford and other relatives of the crew, including the widow of the tail gunner, Flight Sergeant Hellekson.

RAF and RCAF Colours flying at the crash site during the dedication ceremony, 18 May 1995
RAF and RCAF Colours flying at the crash site

 

The Dedication Plaque on the Memorial
The Dedication Plaque on the Memorial

The lower plaque reads;

 

UNVEILED ON 18th MAY 1995 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE CRASH OF   KB993 BY MRS MARION CLIFFORD, CANADA. ERECTED BY PAUL BOOTH AND STEPHEN LEWIS TO THE MEMORY OF THOSE KILLED.

The upper plaque reads;

ON THE NIGHT OF MAY 18th 1945 AVRO LANCASTER KB993 OF   CANADIAN 408 SQUADRON CRASHED AT THIS PLACE.THE CREW WERE FLYING CIRCUITS AND BUMPS

F.O A.A CLIFFORD

F.O D.A FEHRMAN

W.O M.C CAMERON

F.S C.J HALVORSON

F.S L.C HELLERSON

P.O K.B McIVERTWENTY

SEVEN DAYS LATER 408 GOOSE SQUADRON RETURNED TO CANADA.

FOR FREEDOM.

NEARBY ON THE MOOR BELOW LIE THE REMAINS OF C47 SKYTRAIN   2108982 WHICH CRASHED ON THE 24 JULY 1945 WITH THE LOSS OF ALL ON BOARD.

1st Lt G.L.JOHNSON USAAF

1st Lt E.W.BURNS USAAF

1st Lt B.W. IZLAR USAAF

Sgt T.R. McCROCKLIN USAAF

Sgt F.M MALONEY USAAF

Cpl G.R ALEXANDER USAAF

LAC J.D MAIN RAF

IN MEMORY

THEY ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

 

11.Flying Officer A.A. Clifford, Pilot RCAF.  Anthony Arthur Clifford was 21 years of age and is commemorated on page 504 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance.
Flying Officer A.A. Clifford, Pilot RCAF.
Flying Officer D.A. Fehrman, Air Bomber RCAF.  David Arthur Fehrman was 20 years of age and is commemorated on page 514 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance.
Flying Officer D.A. Fehrman, Air Bomber RCAF.
Pilot Officer K.B. McIvor, Flight Engineer RCAF.  Kenneth Bruce McIvor was 34 years of age and is commemorated on page 543 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance.
Pilot Officer K.B. McIvor, Flight Engineer RCAF.
 Flight Sergeant C.J. Halvorson, Air Gunner RCAF. Clarence Julius Halvorson was 34 years of age and is commemorated on page 521 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance
Flight Sergeant C.J. Halvorson, Air Gunner RCAF.
 Warrant Officer II M.C. Cameron, Wireless Operator / Air Gunner RCAF. Michael Cecil Cameron is commemorated on page 501 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance.
Warrant Officer II M.C. Cameron, Wireless Operator / Air Gunner RCAF.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The crew of EQ-U is interned at Brookwood Military Cemetery at Pirbright, UK.  In September of 2006 Christine Hulett, the great-niece of WO2 M.C. Cameron, visited the cemetery and took photos of the grave markers of the crew.  The photos above were provided by her for 408 Squadron.

Stewart Edwin “Stu” McGOWAN March 1, 1938 – February 17, 2014

McGOWAN, Stewart (Stu) Edwin OStJ, CD BGen Retired March 1, 1938 – February 17, 20149095509341_64077f353b_n

With great sadness the McGowan family announces the unexpected death of Stu while in Lima, Peru. Paddy and Stu were on a glorious cruise through the Panama Canal. His last days were spent enjoying the seas in a magnificent ship, lying in the sun on the pool deck with a rum and coke in hand. Stu was born in the Town of Mount Royal, Quebec, the son of Muriel (Muffet) Stewart and Edwin Archibald (Mac) McGowan. He graduated from Victoria High School in 1955 and Royal Military College in 1960.

Stu’s career included flying Trackers off HMCS Bonaventure; an exchange posting with the USN; flying Sea King Helicopters from HMC Ships Margaree and Assiniboine; Command of 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron in Edmonton (his favourite posting); Base Commander in Winnipeg during visits of Queen Elizabeth and Pope John Paul II; Director of Army Aviation in St. Hubert; Command Director at NORAD Headquarters in Colorado Springs; and finally Deputy Director of NORAD, Alaska Region. Stu retired in Victoria in 1993.

He loved being the skipper of a Harbour Ferry and was “lead ballerina” in the Sunday morning Blue Danube Waltz of the Ferries. As President of the Board of St. John Ambulance, Stu oversaw their building expansion on Pandora St. After helping with security during the Vancouver Commonwealth Games he joined the Rotary Club where he found his place in a group of like-minded individuals. “Service Above Self” is what guided Stu his entire life.

Stu leaves his loving wife Paddy, sons Blair and Bryce (Chanida) and beloved grandchildren Draeven, Carly and Ryan. He will be sadly missed by brothers Kim (Dawna), Jay (Sandra), sister Robyn Whitbread (Ian) and was predeceased by Sister Peta Ann (Jackson) of the Convent of St. John the Divine in North York, ON.

A Memorial Service will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Monday, March 3rd, 2014 at St. John the Divine, 1161 Quadra Street, Victoria. Reception to follow. Flowers gratefully declined. If desired donations to a charity of choice would be appreciated.

In memoriam

Guest Book: http://www.legacy.com/guestbooks/timescolonist/stewart-mcgowan-condolences/169885565?cid=full#sthash.l4NAz2ko.dpbs

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/timescolonist/obituary.aspx?n=stewart-edwin-mcgowan-stu&pid=169885565

408 Returns home from their Mission in the Philippines

News release from the CF:

EDMONTON – Members of Edmonton-based 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron (THS) have begun returning home from their mission in the Philippines just in time for the holidays. The first 408 THS personnel arrived this

408 returns home
408 returns home

morning where they were greeted by family, friends, squadron members and VIPs. Additional members of the Squadron will be returning to Edmonton over the next several days via Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CC-177 Globemaster III transports.

On 10 November 2013, the Government of Canada deployed the Interdepartmental Strategic Support Team (ISST) to the Philippines aboard a RCAF CC-144 Challenger aircraft to help assess the needs of the affected population and identify areas for potential support. Within 24 – hours of this initial deployment, additional RCAF aircraft and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) had been mobilized and were enroute to the region.

The RCAF began deploying three CH-146 Griffon helicopters and air personnel on 17 November 2013 to support the DART as part of Op RENAISSANCE, the Government of Canada’s humanitarian assistance and relief effort in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan.

The Government of Canada announced earlier this week that the Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) has completed its humanitarian assistance mission in the Philippines and is currently planning for redeployment to Canada.

Quick Facts

* Canada’s Aviation Detachment for the Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) in the Philippines consisted of three CH-146 Griffon helicopters which chalked up some impressive statistics in just under 30 days. As of December 16:

· It flew a total of 358 flying hours – a flying rate normally achieved with 12 aircraft under normal circumstances back in Canada.

· It delivered a total of 318,585 lbs of cargo of which 298,400 lbs was food aid, and carried a total of 825 passengers.