Guestbook1

Write a new entry for the Guestbook

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fields marked with * are obligatory.
Your E-mail address wil not be published.
For security reasons we save the ip address 3.226.122.74.
It might be that your entry will only be visible in the guestbook after we reviewed it.
We reserve our right to edit, delete, or not publish entries.
190 entries.
Therese Allen Therese Allen wrote on February 3, 2017:
Hi, I am looking for any information regarding my uncle, Ronald Ayliffe Schrapel who served two missions in RCAF 408 Squadron. Ron (dec) was Australian but flew with the RCAF, I think he was a rear gunner. I can be contacted at allentaa31@gmail.com. Thank you
Nancy Kelly Nancy Kelly wrote on January 20, 2017:
Hello, My father WO II Garfield Kelly was in Squadron 408 during the war.
Andrew Yeates Andrew Yeates wrote on October 4, 2016:
I\'m a serving member of the RAF in the UK and I\'m trying to conduct some research into my family history. Ive got a photo that was taken during WW2 in York at the Castle Hotel on Castlegate and the lady in the centre of the picture is my Mums Mum her name was Vera Green she was the landlady at at the Castle Hotel, she\'s sadly now passed on. I would like to try and trace some off the men in the picture, it\'s a long shot but I\'m guessing that they were members of 426 or 408 Sqn as RAF Linton on Ouse is/was the nearest RAF base to York and I know that 426 and 408 served there during WW2. Also could you let me know how I can get the picture published on your website? Many thanks.
Lloyd Truscott Lloyd Truscott wrote on September 28, 2016:
Hi, I want to touch base with the Association but there are no contacts listed. On July 29, 2017, me a a few others will be dedicating a Memorial to the crew of 408 Sqn Lancaster LL687 EQ*M at the Spreckens Germany cemetery. LL687 was lost on July 29, 1944 at Spreckens. My Uncle F/S Harold Truscott was MUG on that Lancaster. All crew were killed except RAF Ft Eng David Scott who was PoW (www.davidscottdiary.com) I have tracked down members of each crewmans families and several of us have decided to erect this Memorial with the support of the local German authorities. I would like to know if the Association wants to be part of this dedication. As a point of interest, Wally Kasper\'s MUG, Andre Blais, was mid under gunner on this Lancaster. Please contact me as soon as possible. Thank you. Lloyd Truscott
David Richardson David Richardson wrote on September 8, 2016:
In your Book of Remembrance for the 13th June 1944 you have listed 6 members of the crew of Lancaster EQ-Y who are buried in the Forenville Military Cemetery near Cambrai in Northern France. They appear to have been part of a raid on the Cambrai area and were not the only crew lost. Did anyone from this crew survive? as I guess a Lancaster crew would be at least 7 normally. This cemetery at Forenville is small, in a lovely rural setting, and is beautifully maintained. It is, in the main, a World War 1 cemetery of just over 100 men and these 6 airmen are the only WW2 casualties in there. My reason for contacting you relates to the fact that the majority of those buried there (including my grandfather) were killed in action on the 8th October 1918. I am organising a small commemorative centenary event at Forenville on the 8th October 2018 and have contacted the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the local Mayors office. Things are very much at an initial stage with more than two years to go, but I wanted any descendants or family of these 6 Canadians to be aware of the event. Although our focus will be on the centenary of the WW1 loses - you can be assured that we will observe fitting remembrance of these 6 men as well. I can be reached at the email address I have appended to this entry.
David Richardson David Richardson wrote on September 8, 2016:
In your Book of Remembrance for the 13th June 1944 you have listed 6 members of the crew of Lancaster EQ-Y who are buried in the Forenville Military Cemetery near Cambrai in Northern France. They appear to have been part of a raid on the Cambrai area and were not the only crew lost. Did anyone from this crew survive? as I guess a Lancaster crew would be at least 7 normally. This cemetery at Forenville is small, in a lovely rural setting, and is beautifully maintained. It is, in the main, a World War 1 cemetery of just over 100 men and these 6 airmen are the only WW2 casualties in there. My reason for contacting you relates to the fact that the majority of those buried there (including my grandfather) were killed in action on the 8th October 1918. I am organising a small commemorative centenary event at Forenville on the 8th October 2018 and have contacted the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the local Mayors office. Things are very much at an initial stage with more than two years to go, but I wanted any descendants or family of these 6 Canadians to be aware of the event. Although our focus will be on the centenary of the WW1 loses - you can be assured that we will observe fitting remembrance of these 6 men as well. I can be reached at the email address I have appended to this entry.
Malcolm Brooke Malcolm Brooke wrote on August 27, 2016:
I am the webmaster of the 49Sqn Association. One of our recent projects has been to photograph the graves of former members of the squadron who were killed with other units. One of these is Idris Hughes who was briefly posted in to our squadron in July/August 1941. He was killed in an accident in July 1942.....almost a year later. I would be very interested to know how many operations he flew with 408Sqn before his death and/or any other information about this airman. Many thanks.
Malcolm Brooke Malcolm Brooke wrote on August 27, 2016:
I am the webmaster of the 49Sqn Association. One of our recent projects has been to photograph the graves of former members of the squadron who were killed with other units. One of these is Idris Hughes who was briefly posted in to our squadron in July/August 1941. He was killed in an accident in July 1942.....almost a year later. I would be very interested to know how many operations he flew with 408Sqn before his death and/or any other information about this airman. Many thanks.
Lloyd Truscott Lloyd Truscott wrote on August 20, 2016:
Family members of the crew from 408sqn Lancaster LL687 EQ*M are planning to erect a Memorial in Germany next year. Lancaster LL687 EQ*M was lost during operations over Hamburg on July 29, 1944. My Uncle, Flt Sgt Harold E Truscott was MuG. All crew perished except RAF Flt Eng David Scott who was PoW (www.davidscottdiary.com) We would like to have the 408sqn involved with this Memorial. We also have a Facebook Group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1025845207489469/) Please contact me as soon as possible. Thank you. Lloyd Truscott
Colin Savill Colin Savill wrote on August 2, 2016:
I am in the process of researching the history of RAF Balderton. Would there be any former Squadron members prepared to relate their stories/memories of their time stationed there. Additionally if there is any relevant Squadron history that I could possibly make use of. Regards Colin Savill Newark Air Museum
Gary R. Tetzlaff Gary R. Tetzlaff wrote on June 24, 2016:
Fifteen years ago tonight, Kingsville celebrated the 60th anniversary of the formation of the 408 Goose Squadron with a love-in at the Kingsville Legion. More than the capacity 200 attended the event which followed the landing of a CH-146 Griffon on the Museum grounds. The commanding officer, and the Chief Warant Officer was present with a contingent from Edmonton to lay-up the first colours of the Squadron and to thank the people of the Kingsville for their wartime contribution to the squadron back in 1944-45. And just like that, a new generation of heros and contributors to the proud reputation of the EQ-Goose Squadron have extended the history of this justifiably proud Squadron. On the eve of the 75th Anniversary of formation of Nels Timmerman\'s Squadron in wartime England, best wishes to all those who continue to serve Canada so proudly. You make us a better nation in the process. Life challenges... and the 408 rises to the occasion! For Freedom, Gary Tetzlaff Kingsville and Leamington ON
Andrew Poole Andrew Poole wrote on May 20, 2016:
Thank you to the two Griffon crews who flew the Memorial Cup into Red Deer yesterday. I think they were a little shocked when kids swarmed the choppers!
Jean Claude Charlebois Jean Claude Charlebois wrote on April 17, 2016:
WE are making progress with our search for the families of Lancaster LL687 EQ M. Of the 8 man crew (extra gunner) we have made contact with at least one family member of 5 of the crew members. If anyone is interested in their story, feel free to join our Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/1025845207489469/ We suggest to first read: http://davidscottdiary.com/ for the background story of outstanding courage of the only survivor. Best wishes to all. JC
J.C. Charlebois J.C. Charlebois wrote on March 27, 2016:
nwsmk Hi again, We have new developments on the David Scott story. 5 of the 8 man crew\'s families have been contacted. The crash area of Lancaster LL687 EQ-M has been positively identified in Spreckens Germany. We now have a Facebook Group Page:https://www.facebook.com/groups/1025845207489469/ We are planning a memorial plaque dedication event in Germany. If you visit our FB page you keep updated with the latest developments. Best wishes, JC
George R McKillop George R McKillop wrote on February 25, 2016:
From Keith Rogers To the family of Wally Phillips, from Keith Rogers, son to Jim (Buck) Rogers, Wireless Operator, who flew with Wally during the war in Lancaster Bombers as part of the Royal Canadian Airforce’s 408 Squadron based out of Linton on Ouse in Yorkshire, England. Wally and my father flew together on no less than 18 of their 30 plus sorties and mostly over Germany at the height of the most intense period of attrition of the war between July 1943 and March 1944. They were billeted together at Beningbrough Hall for the duration. My father, before his death two years ago, often spoke of his pilot Wally Phillips, who he considered with the affection of a family member. He described Wally as a natural leader, an ace pilot, an inspiration and a man with an admiration for his own crew. Both were lucky to survive the war with their lives. It’s true to say that these courageous young men were robbed of much of their youth but in the face of extreme danger, sorrow, grief and fear there was also a shared sense of humour with much laughter and companionship, a bond forged in adversity. They were brought together many years later when my brother Richard visited Canada and after a little detective work managed to trace Wally and from that day their friendship once again flourished. In 2013 Wally made his last and most epic journey to the UK at the age of 95 accompanied by Devon and Geoff to join my father and me for a re-union at RAF Linton on Ouse and at Beningbrough Hall. We got a royal reception and attracted the interest of Yorkshire Television News which filmed and aired the occasion that very evening. Both men knew this was their last reunion and it was an emotional farewell. They would have fallen about laughing if they could have seen themselves trying to hug each other seated in their wheelchairs. This was my first and only meeting with Wally but over those two days I appreciated that I was sharing the company of an extraordinary man, a man of high intellect and a razor sharp wit that had clearly not diminished with age. Wally, I feel that I owe my very existence to you and this is a heartfelt thank you for carrying my father safely through those times.