1941 – 1946

Honours and Awards 1941 – 1946

[tab:Overview] The following is a list of all personnel who received honours and awards while serving with the Squadron during this time period. It is arranged in alphabetical order.

Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)

The cross is awarded to officers and Warrant Officers for an act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty performed whilst flying in active operations against the enemy. The slip-on bar has an eagle in the centre. The year of the award is engraved on the reverse. For more info….

Bar

A straight silver bar is awarded for a further act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty whilst flying in active operations against the enemy. The slip-on bar has an eagle in the centre. The year of the award is engraved on the reverse.

 

Distinguished Flying Medal (DFM)

The award was made to non-commissioned officers and men for an act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty performed whilst flying in active operations against the enemy. For more info…

 

 

 

 

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ALLEN , P/O Daniel Frederick (J16423)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 6 April 1943 and AFRO 809/43 dated 7 May 1943. Born in Salem, Massachusetts, 1921, home in Lennoxville, Quebec. Educated there and in Sherbrooke. Enlisted in Sherbrooke, Quebec, 22 July 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 28 November 1940), No.4 EFTS (graduated 28 January 1941), and No.8 SFTS (graduated 17 May 1941). Commissioned 1942. Photo PL-20458 shows him wearing DFC ribbon.

This officer has completed thirty sorties involving attacks on a variety of well-defended targets in Germany and northern France. He is an efficient captain whose determination to complete his task successfully has set a praiseworthy example. On one occasion when returning from Hamburg his aircraft was badly damaged by enemy action but he flew it back to base.

ANDERSON , P/O Leonard Gerhard (J88645)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Born 1913 in Saskatchewan; home in Lacadena, Saskatchewan (grain elevator agent). Enlisted 29 February 1942 in Saskatoon. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.5 AOS (graduated 30 April 1943). Commissioned August 1944. Award presented 18 June 1949. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 6 December 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (170 hours 20 minutes), 23 June to 12 October 1944.

Pilot Officer Anderson has now successfully completed a tour against the enemy on four-engined bombers. He has navigated over many heavily defended targets on the continent, including Hamburg, Duisburg and Essen. Throughout his tour he has proven to be a most able navigator and on many occasions was responsible for the safety of his aircraft and crew by skilful navigation. His cheerfulness, co-operation and disregard for dangers has been an inspiration to his crew members and other navigators of the squadron.

ARMITAGE, F/O Robert Munday (J35566)Distinguished Flying Cross -No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Born 1914 in Timmins, Ontario; home in Parry Sound, Ontario. Clerk and store manager; enlisted in North Bay, Ontario, 29 June 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 3 April 1943), No.12 EFTS (graduated 29 May 1943) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 1 October 1943). Commissioned September 1943. Award sent by registered mail 28 June 1949. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 16 April 1945 when he had flown 36 sorties (215 hours 55 minutes) between 11 September 1944 and 23 February 1945. Died in Parry Sound, Ontario, 19 June 1997.

Flying Officer Armitage has completed a tour of operations against the enemy on four-engined bombers. He has operated deep into the heart of Germany on many occasions and has been over such heavily defended targets as Chemnitz, Hanover, Essen.At all times he has pressed home his attacks and procured many fine photographs of the various targets. He has been a source of inspiration to his crew members by his capability and guidance and has fostered a good squadron spirit.Flying Officer Armitage’s courage and cheerfulness throughout his tour has been outstanding…

ARNILL, P/O William Robert (J90157)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born in Fredericton, New Brunswick, April 1915; home in Dundalk, Ontario. Garage man, enlisted in Toronto, 6 July 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 4 December 1942) and No.1 AOS (graduated 25 June 1943). Commissioned September 1944. Medal presented 22 October 1948. Photo PL-19391 shows him with Sergeant Aubrey Miller at embarkation. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 22 March 1945 when flown 31 sorties (159 hours 20 minutes), 12 August 1944 to 14 January 1945.

Pilot Officer Arnill has now completed a tour of operations against the enemy on heavy bombers as navigator. He has penetrated deep into the heart of Germany on many occasions, and as been over such heavily defended targets as Saarbrucken, Kiel, Duisburg, Dortmund and Dusseldorf. On many occasions Pilot Officer Arnill displayed great courage and by his very efficient navigation was responsible for the safe return of his crew and aircraft. He has at all times proven himself to be a superior navigator and with his cheerful disregard for any difficulties was an inspiration to all his crew members. His splendid record fully warrants the award of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

AUSTEN, F/O Robert James (J15710)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Born in Toronto, 1911; enlisted in Toronto, 2 July 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 14 September 1940), No.4 BGS (graduated 16 May 1941) and No.2 WS (graduated 17 February 1942). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 27 June 1946. Photograph PL-32924 shows F/O Sandy DeZorzi and F/L Austen beside wheel of a Halifax; PL-35400 is a portrait.

Flying Officer Austen has completed a second tour of operational duty and throughout has displayed the highest standard of devotion to duty. His keenness for air operations and his undoubted wireless skill have made him a most valuable member of aircraft crew. He has rendered excellent service.

AUSTIN, F/L Warren Russell (J8939)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 6 July 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1453/45 dated 14 September 1945. Born 1918 in Hamilton, Ontario; home in Sudbury or Paris, Ontario; enlisted Hamilton, 13 January 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 3 July 1941), No.10 EFTS (graduated 20 August 1941) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 21 November 1941). Commissioned 1941. Award sent by registered mail 17 June 1946. Photograph PL-36890 is a portrait.

Flight Lieutenant Austin is a highly skilled and resolute pilot. He has completed very many sorties against enemy targets and has set a fine example in pressing home his attacks. On one occasion in March 1945 he piloted an aircraft detailed to attack Essen. When nearing the target one engine became unserviceable owing to an oil leakage. This did not deter Flight Lieutenant Austin who continued to the target when he eventually bombed at a height much lower than planned. His determination to make every sortie a success has won the greatest praise. He is a fine captain whose example has been well reflected in the operational efficiency of his crew.

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BAILEY, P/O Theodore Reginald (J86729)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born 1922 in Saskatchewan; home in Roadene, Saskatchewan; enlisted Regina, 23 February 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 2 October 1942), No.19 EFTS (graduated 30 December 1942) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Commissioned 1944. Medal presented 2 December 1946. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 27 July 1944 when he had flown 28 sorties (144 hours 24 minutes), 22 March to 25 July 1944.

Pilot Officer Bailey has completed many sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany including Berlin, Frankfurt, Essen and Friedrichshaven. On all his sorties he has shown exceptional keenness and a fine offensive spirit. The results obtained by his crew have been excellent and on many occasions he has brought back splendid photographs of the actual aiming point. Pilot Officer Baily has on all occasions shown himself to be an extremely efficient operational pilot and as such has been a very valuable asset to this squadron. Therefore, I recommend that he be awarded a Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

BAIN, F/O Donald Thomas (J9412)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 26 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 10 August 1943 and AFRO 1849/43 dated 10 September 1943. Born Van Anda, British Columbia, June 1918; home in Agaissiz, British Columbia; enlisted Vancouver 16 April 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 7 August 1941), No.19 EFTS (graduated 22 September 1941) and No.10 SFTS (graduated 19 December 1941). Commissioned December 1941. Award presented 8 December 1944. Applied for operational wings, 31 October 1944; turned down 10 November 1944 because, with nine sorties it was not deemed enough. Remained in postwar RCAF; photograph 104794 shows him in January 1957 upon promotion to Wing Commander.

One night in July 1943, this officer piloted an aircraft to attack Aachen. Whilst over the target area, the bomber was seriously damaged when engaged by an enemy fighter. Despite this, Flying Officer Bain made several determined runs over the objective. On the return flight two more enemy fighters were encountered but Flying Officer Bain out-manoeuvred them. By superb airmanship and great tenacity he succeeded in flying the crippled bomber to this country. He displayed commendable courage and a fine fighting spirit in circumstances of great difficulty.

BAIRD, F/L John Douglas (J45298)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Born 1922 in Vernon, British Columbia; home in Vancouver (farm hand); enlisted Vancouver, 18 June 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 3 October 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 29 December 1941) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 22 May 1942). Commissioned November 1943. Award presented 29 January 1947.

Flight Lieutenant Baird, as captain of aircraft, has completed many missions against heavily defended targets. On an operational sortie to Wanne Eickel one engine of his aircraft caught fire and when efforts to extinguished it proved unsuccessful, Flight Lieutenant Baird ordered his crew to leave the aircraft, which was then at an altitude of 7,000 feet and losing height rapidly. In spite of this experience, this officer’s enthusiasm has remained unaffected and he has continued to display keenness, determination and devotion to duty of the highest order.

BARBER, F/O Truman Verdun (J86279)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. Born 1921 in Toronto; home there (fruit clerk); enlisted there 9 October 1940. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 19 March 1943), No.12 EFTS (graduated 15 May 1943) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 3 September 1943). Commissioned 1944. Invested with medal in Toronto, 30 November 1949. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 1 January 1945 when he had completed 32 sorties (165 hours 15 minutes), 23 June to 26 November 1944.

Pilot Officer Barber has completed a successful operational tour as pilot on heavy bombers in a most exemplary manner. He has on many occasions attacked successfully such heavily defended targets as Essen, Duisburg, Kiel and Cologne. He has at all times shown a cheerful disregard for any defences the enemy had to offer and at all times pressed home his attacks, returning with excellent photographs of the targets attacked.

This officer’s fine operational record and his outstanding service to the squadron are worthy of the highest praise, and I therefore recommend that he be awarded the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

BARNLUND, F/O Russell Edward (J27284)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1478/45 dated 21 September 1945. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.2 BGS and No.5 AOS. Unit identified in AFRO only as “Overseas”; proper unit identified in DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Box 2067).

BARRETT, F/O William Lemert (J18930) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 August 1944 and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944. Born 1921 in Forest Hill, New Brunswick; home in Fredericton (ex-gunner, Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted Moncton, 7 August 1941. Trained at No.6 BGS (graduated 9 November 1942) and No.1 WS (graduated 30 March 1942). Commissioned 1943. Medal sent by registered mail 22 November 1948. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation dated 15 May 1944 when he had flown 26 sorties (169 hours 45 minutes), 9 July 1943 to 27 April 1944.

Pilot Officer Barrett has completed one tour of operations with this squadron as a Wireless Operator. His sorties consisted of many attacks on distant targets in Germany, including five trips to the Ruhr, three to Hamburg, nine to Berlin and several others to southwest Germany. In all these operations, Pilot Officer Barrett has displayed great courage and has et up a fine record of achievement.  As the Deputy Signals Leader of this squadron, he has at all times set a high standard of professional skill, and his enthusiasm towards his duties is largely responsible for the excellent signals record of this squadron.

BARTMAN, P/O Michael (J85663)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born 1920; home in Vegreville, Alberta; served in Canadian Army; e* Vancouver, 21 May 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 23 October 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 19 February 1943). Commissioned 1944. Award presented 11 September 1946. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 27 July 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (156 hours 59 minutes), 15 February to 20 July 1944.

Pilot Officer Bartman has completed a tour of operations as navigator and during his tour he navigated to some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany including Berlin, Frankfurt, Leipzig and Essen. On each operation, Pilot Officer Bartman displayed exceptional skill as a navigator and he was very largely responsible for the splendid operational record of his crew. The very fact that their aircraft was so rarely attacked by enemy night fighters and seldom hit by flak, other than over the target itself, is a good indication of the excellence of his navigation and track keeping.

Pilot Officer Bartman was exceptionally keen to operate at every opportunity; his cheerfulness and navigational ability have made him of the mainstays of his crew and have set a fine example to the whole squadron. Therefore, I recommend that he be granted the award of a Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

BATTEN, LAC Francis Lang Courtney (R95022)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Brandon, Manitoba; Fitter IIE. No citation in AFRO but DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 31 July 1944; enlisted in Winnipeg, 12 February 1941; served seven months in Canada, 34 months in UK.

This airman, by his fine record of achievement, has earned the praise of all members of aircrew with whim he has come in contact. His sterling devotion to duty at all times by doing more than his share has proven him to be an outstanding airman.

BECK, Flight Sergeant Richard Colvin Seddon (NZ 402154)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 March 1942. Born 17 December 1911 in Wesport, Buller, New Zealand; educated at Westport Technical High School; home there (motor mechanic); applied to join RNZAF on a short service commission in April 1937 but was unsuccessful; In June 1939 he applied to enrol in the Civil Service Reserve of Pilots; application deferred. Enlisted as a pilot, July 1940. Took ground training at Levin. Attended No.1 Flying Training School (Taieri) and No,1 Service Flying Training School (Wigram). Awarded wings in January 1941 and promoted to Sergeant. Embarked on SS Awatea on 29 February 1941, arriving No.3 Personnel Reception Centre, Bournemouth, 20 April 1941. Commenced operational training on Hampdens at No.16 Operational Training Unit, Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire, 26 April 1941. To No.408 Squadron, Syerston, Nottinghamshire, in July. Posted to No.49 Squadron, Scampton, Lincolnshire on 29 July 1941, taking part in raids on Calais, Brunswick and Kiel. Reposted to No.408 Squadron on 21 August 1941. Took part in raids on Hamburg, Essen, Bocholt, Duisburg, Bremen, Cologne and Dusseldorf as well as mine laying in Heligoland Bight. Commissioned 5 February 1942. Posted on 7 March 1942 to No.25 Operational Training Unit, Finningley, Yorkshire. Participated in 1,000-bomber raids on Cologne and Essen. Killed 24 July 1942 when his Wellington collided with another Wellington near the aerodrome. No published citation other than “for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations.” Air Ministry Bulletin 6484 refers but with no citation. The RNZAF Museum on 13 January 1999 provided much of the foregoing biographical information and the following citation from its own records.

During his operational tour this airman has carried out some particularly fine flights. In January 1942 he carried out a successful mine laying mission off La Rochelle in adverse weather. A few days previously he attacked a synthetic rubber factory at Huls. In September 1941 he participated in a daylight raid on Abbeville.  On several occasions he has attacked the searchlight belt near Bochold, thus facilitating the passage of our bombers to their objective. This airman has set a very fine example.

This Flight Sergeant pilot, with Sergeant Fraser as navigator has carried out some particularly fine flights during the course of his 29 sorties involving 169 hours flying. He carried out a most successful mine-laying flight to La Rochelle in January 1942, and despite adverse weather conditions, planted his mine successfully in the correct place. He also made a successful attack on the synthetic rubber factory at Huls a few days previously and obtained a first class night photograph. In addition, he took part in a successful daylight raid in formation on Abbeville in September 1941. On two or three occasions, he has been detailed to attack the searchlight belt near Bocholt. On each occasion, he has carried out a determined attack which enabled other aircraft to press on to the targets in the Ruhr practically unhindered. On all occasions, this pilot has set a fine example of courage and devotion to duty and has been an inspiration to other pilots in the squadron. This Non-Commissioned Officer is in the Royal New Zealand Air Force attached to the Royal Air Force.

BECKETT, Sergeant James Gilbert (RAF 526997)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. Engine Fitter (F2E).

BELL, F/O Andrew Gordon (J14413)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 6 June 1944 and AFRO 1660/44 dated 4 August 1944. Born in 1918; home in Saint John, New Brunswick; enlisted in Moncton, 4 August 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 14 March 1942), No.17 EFTS (graduated 7 May 1942), and No.9 AOS (graduated 25 September 1942). Commissioned 1941. Medal presented 5 October 1946. Died in Cote St.Luc, Quebec, 27 January 2002. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/8780 has recommendation by W/C D.S. Jacobs dated 23 February 1944 when he had flown 24 sorties (164 hours 53 minutes).

Flying Officer Bell is well on the way towards completion of his present tour of operations. He has navigated his aircraft to numerous distant targets with considerable success. Flying Officer Bell has at all times set an inspiring example as a Navigator both by his skill and cheerful attitudes towards his duties. On one occasion, although practically overcome by sickness, he remained at his post and assisted his captain in pressing home his attack and was responsible for the safe return of the aircraft. I strongly recommend that this officer be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

BELL, FS John Kopf (R65428)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Born 1912 in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia; home there. Enlisted in Halifax, 12 September 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 7 February 1941), No.1 BGS (graduated 21 June 1941), No.1 AOS (graduated 26 April 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 22 July 1941). Commissioned 1942.

BELL, P/O John Kopf (J16345)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 June 1943 and AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943. Medal presented 21 March 1944.

Pilot Officer Bell has completed a large number of operational sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in enemy territory including Lorient, Munich, Hamburg, St.Nazaire and the Ruhr. On one occasion in August 1942, his aircraft was badly damaged by an enemy night fighter just prior to reaching the target. Despite this the mission was successfully completed. With one engine useless and whilst over the sea the pilot experienced considerable difficulty in holding the rudders. Pilot Officer Bell immediately came to his assistance and by his co-operation and calmness contributed in a large measure to the safe return of the aircraft. At all times with a cool, quiet manner, Pilot Officer Bell has displayed a fine fighting spirit, skill and initiative worthy of high praise.

BELL, Sergeant Ronald George (R76955)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Born in Kelowna, Saskatchewan, 1915; home in Vancouver (salesman); enlisted in Edmonton, 17 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 29 April 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 7 July 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 13 September 1941). Killed in flying accident, 9 November 1942 (crew of five, fighter affiliation exercise).

One night in August 1942, this airman was the pilot of an aircraft detailed to attack Duisburg. Whilst over the target area his aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter from close range. Diving steeply, Sergeant Bell evaded further attacks but his aircraft sustained extensive damage. The elevator, port ailerons and fuselage were all pierced, the port petrol tanks were riddled while the hydraulics were shot away and one of the gun cupolas was smashed. The wireless operator was injured and Sergeant Bell was badly cut on the right hand by splintered perspex. Despite this he made another run over the target and bombed it. Shortly after leaving the target area one of the engines failed and the aircraft spun towards the ground. Sergeant Bell, however, skilfully regained control and eventually flew his damaged bomber back to an aerodrome in this country where he executed a skilful crash landing. In face of harassing circumstances this airman displayed great courage and devotion to duty.

BENNETT, F/O Gordon (J15248)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 26 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 6 August 1943 and AFRO 1849/43 dated 10 September 1943. Born in St.Boniface, Manitoba; home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 20 November 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 February 1941), No.14 EFTS (graduated 4 May 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 14 July 1941). Commissioned 1942. Cited with Sergeant A. Rogers (RAF). Medal presented 17 December 1943. See also Baker, Eli (navigator).

Flying Officer Bennett and Sergeant Rogers were pilot and wireless operator of an aircraft detailed to attack Gelsenkirchen. Whilst over the target area the bomber was hit by anti-aircraft fire. Some stores caught fire and burned furiously. Coolly, Flying Officer Bennett dived his aircraft and the force of the wind put out the flames on the burning fabric. Meanwhile, acting with great promptitude, Sergeant Rogers fought the flames inside the bomber with the extinguishers. By these means he succeeded in subduing the fire although much of the equipment including the hydraulic system were rendered unserviceable. Flying Officer Bennett flew the damaged bomber to an airfield in this country and landed it safely. His skill and resource were worthy of high praise while Sergeant Rogers displayed commendable promptitude and skill.

BERRY, P/O Robert Charles (J16128)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 June 1943 and AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943. Born Hamilton, 1921; home there; enlisted there 20 August 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 6 November 1940), No.4 BGS (graduated 10 April 1941) and No.2 WS (graduated 17 March 1941). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 12 December 1944.

In the capacity of wireless operator/air gunner this officer has displayed commendable courage and devotion to duty. In July 1942, when returning from an attack on Dusseldorf his aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter which was destroyed after a ten minute combat. On many other occasions this officer has displayed courage and resource during operations. His conscientiousness and efficiency have contributed materially to the success attained by his crew.

BIGGANE, P/O Denzil Francis Heriz (RAF 60569)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 November 1941. Born in Allahabad, 1918; home in Gloucestershire; enlisted in RAF, January 1940; commissioned January 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 5664 refers. Citation and unit given in Flight, 11 December 1941. However, he may have won it for previous services in No.44 Squadron. Missing in action, March 1943.

On night in November 1941 this officer was the pilot of an aircraft which carried out a mine-laying mission in waters near the enemy coast. Extremely adverse weather conditions were encountered whilst flying over the sea, and when the target was reached, very heavy clouds were encountered. Nevertheless, Pilot Officer Biggane descended beneath them and skilfully located his position.  Whilst making his approach to the target his aircraft was illuminated by searchlights and immediately subjected to intense and accurate fire from two armed ships. Defying the barrage, Pilot Officer Biggane continued his course, and although his aircraft received a direct hit on one of the wings, he skilfully accomplished his task.

This officer has completed many operational sorties, including attacks on important targets in Germany. On one occasion, whilst flying to Mannheim, his aircraft was attacked by two enemy fighters whilst held in a concentration of searchlights, but although his aircraft sustained damage, Pilot Officer Biggane skilfully evaded his attackers, continued his flight, and finally bombed his objective.  On a second occasion, in the course of another mission, he attacked two ships, scoring a direct hit on one of them from a low level.  Throughout, this officer has displayed great determination, courage and initiative.

BOND, F/L Albert Jess (C8672)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 15 November 1941. Served in administrative duties at No.10 SFTS, Dauphin, before going overseas in July 1942. Was Adjutant to No.411 Squadron before going to No.408 Squadron. No citation but DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 22 August 1943.

Flight Lieutenant Bond has served in the Royal Canadian Air Force since the 15th November 1941, during which time he has served latterly as Adjutant to this squadron. His devotion to duty and increasing labours have contributed to maintaining a high standard of efficiency on this squadron. His exemplary character and very understanding temperament have won him the respect and devotion of all those working under him.

BOOSEY, F/L Robert Henry George (RAF 110552)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 April 1943. Born in Faversham, Kent, 1920; home in Vange, Pitsea, Essex; educated at John Henry Burrows; enlisted 1940; commissioned 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 9917 refers. The following citation was published in Flight, 20 May 1943:

While serving as an operational pilot, Flight Lieutenant Boosey has displayed courage and coolness of a very high order. He has participated in sorties against such targets as Bremen, Dusseldorf, Kassel, Lorient, and in numerous mine laying operations. He has on several occasions brought back excellent photographs of the aiming point. In February 1943, when about to land, after an attack on Cologne, his port outer engine caught fire, and the port inner engine stopped when the aircraft was at a height of about 300 feet. Flight Lieutenant Boosey, with great skill and coolness, kept the aircraft under control and climbed to 900 feet where the crew baled out safely. With complete disregard of his personal safety, the pilot then made a successful crash landing.

Since joining this squadron in June 1942, Squadron Leader Boosey has carried out 26 operational sorties over enemy territory and carried out attacks on the mist intensely defended enemy targets. These operations included sorties to Bremen, Saarbrucken (2), Mainz, Dusseldorf (2), Osnabruck, Flensburg, Kassel, Lorient, Wilhelmshaven (2), Berlin (2), Munich, Stuttgart, Duisburg, Frankfurt, Cologne, Gardening (7).During these operations Squadron Leader Boosey has pressed home his attack with utmost determination, and has shown courage and coolness of a very high order in that on four consecutive sorties, namely, Dusseldorf, Osnabruck, Flensburg and Wilhelmshaven, this officer brought back pictures of the actual aiming point. On the night of the 1st March 1943, when carrying out a raid on Berlin, Germany, this officer piloted his aircraft in such a manner as to obtain a picture within a mile of the aiming point of Berlin.On the night of the 14th February 1943, when returning from Cologne and when making his approach to land, his port outer engine caught fire and the port inner stopped when at about 300 feet. Squadron Leader Boosey managed to keep his aircraft under control;, climbed the aircraft to 900 feet and ordered his crew to bale out, then attempted a successful crash landing at night on return from operations. This officer’s coolness and devotion to duty and complete disregard for his personal safety contributed to the success of this trip.

BOSSENBERRY, S/L Alvin (J8377)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Home in Grand Bend, Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 14 January 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 21 June 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 8 August 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 25 October 1941). Award sent by registered mail 28 June 1949. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 22 May 1945 when he had flown 18 sorties (110 hours 45 minutes) between 18 December 1944 and 18 April 1945.

Squadron Leader Bossenberry has filled the position of Flight Commander in this squadron for several months and has proved himself to be an outstanding organizer with admirable squadron spirit. His keenness for operations and his enthusiasm for all the work of the squadron has contributed a great deal toward the general success of this unit.  He has taken part in many operational sorties against the enemy, and at all times has pressed home his attacks with the utmost confidence, regardless of any opposition thrown up against him. He has earned Target Tokens for pictures of his aiming points on several occasions. On his first sortie with his crew, which was against Cologne, his navigational aids failed but he pressed on to the target, bombing it successfully. On a later raid against Munster his aircraft suffered extensive flak damage, and on another occasion when leaving the target which was Hamburg, he was attacked by fighters, but these were successfully evaded largely due to the flying skill of this pilot.  Squadron Leader Bossenberry has been a fine example to all of the members of this squadron…

BOWDEN, P/O Victor Edward (RAF 171868)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 June 1944. Born 1922 in Harpenden, Herts.; educated at St.Albans School; enlisted 1941; trained in United States (although AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945 reported his Bar to DFC under the heading “RAF Trained in Canada”); commissioned 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 14171/AL.818 refers. No citation other than “has completed many successful operations against the enemy in which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.”

BOWHAY, F/O Robert Wilfred (J35177)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. Home in Three Hills, Alberta; enlisted Calgary 20 July 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 20 March 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 15 May 1943) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 3 September 1943). Award sent by registered mail 7 June 1950. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 1 February 1945 when he had flown 32 sorties (173 hours five minutes), 16 August to 17 December 1944.

Flying Officer Bowhay has now completed a tour of operations against the enemy on four-engined bombers. He has penetrated deep into the heart of enemy occupied territory, as pilot, on many occasions, attacking such heavily defended targets as Kiel, Wanne Eickel, Duisburg and Sterkrade.  Throughout his tour Flying Officer Bowhay has been an inspiration to both his crew and other members of the squadron, by his total disregard for danger in every respect. His record shows that many excellent photographs were obtained of targets bombed and he has never hesitated to do more than his share on all occasions.  Cool, capable and a good leader, he has instilled confidence in all with whom he came in contact. I therefore recommend him for the award of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

BOWLBY, Sergeant Arthur Tremaine (R124853)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 November 1943 as per London Gazette dated 19 November 1943 and AFRO 166/44 dated 28 January 1944. Home in Wilmot, Nova Scotia; enlisted Halifax, 17 September 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 13 March 1942) and No.4 BGS (graduated 22 June 1942). Award presented 16 April 1948. Long typed interview in DHist files.

This airman has participated in very many sorties and has displayed great keenness throughout. He is a resolute and skilful air gunner whose coolness in the face of the enemy has won high praise. His example has been most inspiring

BOYNTON, Sergeant Benjamin Douglas (R110387)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 6 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 August 1943 and AFRO 1849/43 dated 10 September 1943. Home in Calgary; enlisted Vancouver 7 July 1941. Trained at No.6 BGS (graduated 8 June 1942) and No.2 WS (graduated 25 May 1942). Award presented 28 March 1944.

This airman has taken part in operational sorties against targets which include Cologne, Kiel, Frankfurt, Dusseldorf and Dortmund. While returning from Wuppertal in May 1943, the aircraft in which he was flying as rear gunner was attacked on two occasions by enemy fighters. The first attack was successfully evaded on instructions given to the captain by Sergeant Boynton. The second enemy aircraft attacked a little later and during the ensuing engagement this airman gave an able commentary, again enabling successful evasive action to be taken. At the same time he engaged his assailant with his guns and shot the enemy aircraft down in flames. During this combat Sergeant Boynton maintained great coolness. His own aircraft suffered no damage and made a safe return.

BROWN, P/O Allan Keith (J92578)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 6 July 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1453/45 dated 14 September 1945. Home at Midnapore, Alberta; enlisted Calgary 24 June 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 2 December 1941), No.8 EFTS (graduated 13 February 1942) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 19 June 1942). Award presented 9 July 1949.

One night in April 1945 Pilot Officer Brown was pilot in an aircraft detailed to attack Harburg. On the outward flight the port outer engine had to be put out of action. In spite of this, Pilot Officer Brown flew on to the target and executed a good attack. Soon afterwards the starboard outer engine failed as did the port inner engine a little later. The aircraft lost height so rapidly that only three members of the crew were able to leave by parachute. At this stage the last engine failed. Displaying outstanding coolness and exceptional skill, Pilot Officer Brown proceeded to land the aircraft by altimeter and air speed indicator only, at night, in enemy territory where not a single light was shining to assist him in a desperate situation. Fortunately his aircraft came down in open country. So well did Pilot Officer Brown accomplish his task that not a single member of his crew was injured. This officer set a splendid example of skill, coolness and courage.

BROWN, F/L Douglas Arthur (J26128)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 765/45 dated 4 May 1945. Home in Sutton, Quebec; enlisted Montreal, 18 February 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 1 August 1942), No.13 EFTS (graduated 20 November 1942) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Award sent by registered mail 6 May 1949.

Flight Lieutenant Brown has shown commendable courage, determination and devotion to duty throughout an operational tour. He has completed a large number of sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets such as Essen, Dusseldorf and Kiel. By his keenness and cheerful confidence he has set a sterling example to all his crew. On one occasion in October 1944, during an attack against Hamburg, one engine of his aircraft was rendered unserviceable. The propeller came off and fire broke out. Despite this, Flight Lieutenant Brown pressed on to the target which was successfully bombed. The aircraft was very difficult to control on the return flight and he ordered his crew to leave by parachute. With outstanding airmanship he succeeded in executing a masterly landing without further damage being sustained.

BROWN, F/L James Albert (J19704)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Home in North Bay; enlisted there 4 June 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 25 September 1941), No.21 EFTS (graduated 21 November 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 10 April 1942). Award sent by registered mail 30 March 1949. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 8 November 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (144 hours ten minutes), 18 April to 23 October 1944.

Flight Lieutenant Brown has completed an operational tour as pilot on four engined bombers in a most exemplary manner. He has on many occasions attacked successfully such heavily defended targets deep in Germany as Dortmund, Sterkrade, Duisburg and Essen. He has at all times shown a cheerful disregard for any defences the enemy had to offer, pressing home his attacks successfully, and returning to base with excellent photographs of the target attacked.  In his capacity as Deputy Flight Commander, Flight Lieutenant Brown has proved himself to be a fine leader, and by his fine operational record has been an inspiration to the men under him.  On one occasion, just after becoming airborne on an operation, the leading edge of his aircraft blew open. By extreme skill, Flight Lieutenant Brown successfully landed his aircraft, saving the lives of his crew.  This officer’s fine operational record and his long standing services to the squadron are worthy of the highest praise. Therefore, I recommend that he be awarded the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

BRYDON, F/L Newton Reid (J17141)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Home in Waterville, Nova Scotia; enlisted Halifax, 22 April 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 8 August 1941), No.5 AOS (graduated 9 November 1941), No.7 BGS (graduated 17 January 1942) and No.1 ANS (graduated 19 February 1942). Squadron Bombing Leader. Postwar RCAF including No.103 Search and Rescue Unit, Halifax. Invested with decoration in Halifax 27 July 1949. No citation in AFRO; DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded 31 July 1944. Enlisted 21 April 1941; served eleven months in Canada, 28 months in UK.

Flight Lieutenant Brydon has been with this squadron for several months during which time he has proven himself to be an extremely capable and efficient section commander. He has completed one tour of operations with an excellent record and his service career as a whole has been an admirable one. His cheerfulness and untiring energy have greatly contributed to the excellence of his section.

BRYDON, F/L Newton Reid (J17141)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 6 November 1944. First tour had been 23 sorties (135 hours 45 minutes), 9 August 1942 to 21 January 1943. Second tour (to date) had been 17 sorties (89 hours 40 minutes), 10 November 1943 to 6 November 1944 (interrupted; only one sortie in November 1943, none in December 1943, one in January, one in February, none in March and only one in May, June and July 1944).

Flight Lieutenant Brydon has completed one tour of operations and is well on his way to completing his second tour. He has bombed many heavily defended targets in Germany, many of which being in the Ruhr. No matter how intense the defences which were encountered, Flight Lieutenant Brydon by his exemplary conduct and devotion to duty, proved to be a definite asset to his crew. His bombing record is superior and at present he holds the position of Bombing Leader for the squadron. Here again his devotion to ground training and operational flying is beyond reproach.

BRYSON, F/O Allan Alexander (J25317)Distinguished Flying Cross -No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 14 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 21 May 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 October 1942), No.2 EFTS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.12 SFTS (graduated 16 April 1943). Award sent by registered mail 24 February 1950. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 16 August 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (158 hours 33 minutes), 27 January to 27 July 1944. Rank given as Flying Officer (Acting Flight Lieutenant).

Flight Lieutenant Bryson has completed a very large number of sorties against very many heavily defended targets in Germany, including five to Berlin and others to Essen, Frankfurt and Stuttgart. On every occasion he has pressed home his attacks with great determination, completely disregarding the heaviest enemy defences. Photographic evidence of all his operations have indicated the extreme accuracy with which these missions were carried out, and he has set a splendid example to the whole squadron.

BURNS, F/L Robert (J18363)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1444/44 dated 7 July 1944. Home in Sault Ste.Marie, Ontario; enlisted at North Bay, 22 October or 19 November 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 27 February 1942), No.7 EFTS (graduated 5 June 1942) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 25 September 1942). Invested with award by King George 11 August 1944. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty”. Public Records Office Air 2/9149 has recommendation by W/C D.S. Jacobs dated 25 January 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (177 hours 17 minutes), 25 May 1943 to 27 January 1944.

Since joining the squadron, Flight Lieutenant Burns has carried out a large number of operations against some of the most heavily defended and distant targets in Germany, including at least six sorties to Berlin. This officer has at all times set a very high example as a Captain, and his experience and cheerful attitude towards his duties have been a source of inspiration to the remainder of the squadron. I strongly recommend that this officer be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

BUTCHER, F/O Ronald William (J20961)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 August 1944 and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944. Home in Sackville, New Brunswick; enlisted Moncton, 20 January 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 31 July 1942) and No.4 AOS (graduated 20 November 1942). Award presented 19 August 1949. Long interview with Stu Tait in biographical file at DHist. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation dated 16 May 1944 when he had completed 23 sorties (154 hours 23 minutes), 3 December 1943 to 27 April 1944.

Flying Officer Butcher is nearing the completion of his first tour of operations. He has navigated his aircraft on many occasions to very distant targets in Germany, including seven sorties to Berlin and nine sorties to southwest Germany.  The crew with whom he flies has achieved considerable success on operations, and this is, in no small manner, attributable to Flying Officer Butcher’s skill as a navigator. He has at all times carried out his duties in a determined and cheerful manner, and his offensive spirit is reflected in the remainder of the crew.

BUTLER, F/O Gordon Douglas (J24616)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 7 January 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 2 November 1942) and No.5 AOS (graduated 19 March 1943). Award sent by registered mail 24 February 1950. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation of W/C J.F. Easton dated 4 November 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (133 hours 30 minutes), 9 April to 15 August 1944. Medals with logbook and other documents offered for sale by Gateway Militaria, Catalogue No.14 (1999 ?) for $ 725.00.

Flying Officer Butler has completed a tour of operations as navigator on four engined bombers in an exemplary manner. He has operated against such heavily defended targets in Germany as Dortmund, Wesselling, Kiel and Stuttgart. At all times he has shown complete disregard for any defences encountered and on more than one occasion when his aircraft was damaged by enemy action, he carried on his extremely skilful navigation undeterred by the fact that his compartment was riddled with flak and cannon fire, directly his aircraft accurately back to base. More recently, on precision targets, Flying Officer Butler has taken his aircraft to the target obtaining aiming point photographs whenever cloud conditions permitted.  Flying Officer Butler, by virtue of his sterling leadership and operational ability, has proven himself a great asset to the squadron. Therefore I recommend that he be awarded a Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

BURNS, F/L Robert (J18363)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1444/44 dated 7 July 1944. Home in Sault Ste.Marie, Ontario; enlisted at North Bay, 22 October or 19 November 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 27 February 1942), No.7 EFTS (graduated 5 June 1942) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 25 September 1942). Invested with award by King George 11 August 1944. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty”. Public Records Office Air 2/9149 has recommendation by W/C D.S. Jacobs dated 25 January 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (177 hours 17 minutes), 25 May 1943 to 27 January 1944.

Since joining the squadron, Flight Lieutenant Burns has carried out a large number of operations against some of the most heavily defended and distant targets in Germany, including at least six sorties to Berlin. This officer has at all times set a very high example as a Captain, and his experience and cheerful attitude towards his duties have been a source of inspiration to the remainder of the squadron. I strongly recommend that this officer be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

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CAMPBELL, P/O Hanlon Donald Richard Leroy (87059)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 February 1942. Born in Regina, 1918; home in Vancouver. RAF, October 1939; P/O, 19 October 1940. Joined No.408 Squadron, June 1941. Killed in action 14 May 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 6298 refers. No citation in London Gazette other than “for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations”. Royal Air Force Quarterly (June 1942) spells name as Hanlan and gives the following:

This officer has shown great courage and persistence in attacking heavily defended targets in enemy territory. In September 1941 he participated in three daylight raids over France. On each occasion his aircraft sustained damage from the enemy’s fire, but despite this he carried out his missions successfully. Pilot Officer Campbell has consistently shown a high standard of keenness and devotion to duty.

CAMPBELL, F/O William James (J20820)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 21 July 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2052/44 dated 22 September 1944. Born 1913 in Lethbridge, Alberta; home there or in Ajax, Ontario; enlisted in Calgary 4 September 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 24 April 1942), No.6 BGS (graduated 25 September 1942) and No.10 AOS (graduated 6 November 1942. Award presented. Commissioned 1944.

This officer has completed a noteworthy tour of operations during which a wide range of targets have been attacked. He is a most competent bomb aimer whose determination to obtain good results has been a prominent feature of his work throughout. Flying Officer Campbell has set a fine example to all

CANTER, Sergeant (now P/O) Wilfred (R127907/J17845)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 14 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 27 August 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Born 1921 in Russia; home in Toronto (shipping trade); enlisted there 22 August 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 30 January 1942), No.12 EFTS (graduated 6 April 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 31 July 1942). Award presented by King George 15 May 1945.

In an air operation Sergeant Canter displayed courage and tenacity of a high order.

CAMPBELL, P/O Stanley Enos (J85691)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 16 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Born in Drumheller, Alberta, 1921; home there; enlisted Calgary 2 April 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 21 November 1942) and No.3 BGS (graduated 19 February 1943). Commissioned 1944. Award presented 13 November 1948.

As air gunner, this officer has taken part in very many attacks on a variety of well defended targets including eleven on Berlin. On one occasion in an operation against the German capital his aircraft was engaged by a fighter. Although the enemy attacked with much persistence, Pilot Officer Campbell directed the necessary combat manoeuvres with great skill. Finally Pilot Officer Campbell delivered a well placed burst of fire and the attacker dived towards the ground enveloped in flames. He defended his aircraft with great coolness and confidence, qualities which have made him a most valuable member of aircraft crew.

CHEKALUK, F/L Harry Richard (J24172)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945. Born 1922 at Delacour, Alberta; home in Shepard, Alberta; enlisted Calgary, 9 January 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 17 July 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 7 November 1942) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1943). Commissioned 1943. Award presented 9 July 1949. Served in postwar RCAF (13323) in Edmonton.

Flight Lieutenant Chekaluk has completed a very large number of sorties, many of them involving flights far into enemy territory. On all occasions he has displayed a fine fighting spirit and has always pressed home his attacks with great determination. He is a fine leader and his example of courage and devotion to duty has won much praise.

CLARAHAN, F/L Lawrence Earl (J90841)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Born 1918 in Calgary; home in Olds (farmer); enlisted Calgary, 4 December 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 24 July 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 18 September 1943), and No.15 SFTS (graduated 25 February 1944). Commissioned October 1944. Award presented 14 June 1947.

Flight Lieutenant Clarahan has completed numerous sorties including attacks on such heavily defended targets as Bohlen, Chemnitz, Hamburg and Leipzig. He has at all times displayed a high degree of skill and determination to complete his missions. In March 1945, during an attack against Chemnitz, his aircraft was twice attacked by enemy fighters while over the target are and the second time by a jet propelled aircraft which was shot down. His keenness and fine fighting spirit have always been most commendable and have set an inspiring example to the other members of his squadron.

CLIFTON, F/L Philip Harcourt (RAF 157577)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 April 1945. Born 1920 at Streatham; home in Greenford, Middlesex; educated at Henry Thornton Secondary School (Clapham) and Central School of Arts and Crafts, London; enlisted 8 October 1940 (DHist card said August 1940 but this is wrong); commissioned September 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 18302/AL.1007 refers. No citation other than “completed operations with courage and devotion to duty”.

CLIFTON, F/L Philip Harcourt, DFC (RAF 157577)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. United identified in DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (RG.24 Volume 20607). DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (RG.24 Volume 20606) has recommendation drafted February 1945. Engineer Leader.

Flight Lieutenant Clifton has completed one tour on four-engined bombers and is now on his second tour. He has operated deep into the heart of Germany on many occasions and over such heavily defended targets as Essen, Emden, Kiel, Hamburg and Duisburg. His record as a Flight Engineer and Engineering Leader has been superior. His devotion to ground training and operational flying has been of a high standard, which in turn has radiated a fine spirit in his section.

CLOTHIER, F/L Robert Allan (J15680)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Born 1921 in Prince Rupert; home in Vancouver; enlisted there 19 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 4 March 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 4 May 1941) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 27 July 1941). Commissioned 1942. Award sent by registered mail 21 May 1956.

This officer has completed numerous sorties in the role of pilot, involving attacks on most of the enemy’s heavily defended targets. On all occasions he has pressed home his attacks with great determination and by his personal example of courage, coolness and confidence has set an example which has inspired all with whom he has flown.

CLARAHAN, F/L Lawrence Earl (J90841)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Born 1918 in Calgary; home in Olds (farmer); enlisted Calgary, 4 December 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 24 July 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 18 September 1943), and No.15 SFTS (graduated 25 February 1944). Commissioned October 1944. Award presented 14 June 1947.

Flight Lieutenant Clarahan has completed numerous sorties including attacks on such heavily defended targets as Bohlen, Chemnitz, Hamburg and Leipzig. He has at all times displayed a high degree of skill and determination to complete his missions. In March 1945, during an attack against Chemnitz, his aircraft was twice attacked by enemy fighters while over the target are and the second time by a jet propelled aircraft which was shot down. His keenness and fine fighting spirit have always been most commendable and have set an inspiring example to the other members of his squadron.

COOKE, WO Wilfred Gordon (R52693)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 22 August 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2274/44 dated 20 October 1944. Home in St.Catharines, Ontario; enlisted Niagara Falls, 7 June 1940. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 20 June 1942), No.13 EFTS (graduated 9 October 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 19 March 1943). Award sent by registered mail 1 March 1946.

Warrant Officer Cooke has completed a large number of sorties against a variety of strongly defended targets. He is a splendid captain and pilot whose determination to complete his mission successfully has been most praiseworthy.

CONSTANCE, F/L Delwyn Stanley Norris (NZ 240217)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 October 1942. Born 1913; home at Otahuku, Aukland, New Zealand; enlisted in RNZAF, trained in Canada, commissioned 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 8375 refers. No citation in London Gazette other than “”for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations”. The following summary on DHist card was likely from Air Ministry Bulletin:

This captain of aircraft has taken part in numerous bombing and mine laying sorties. In February 1942 while approaching the German battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft gunfire and badly damaged. Nevertheless, with great determination, he pressed home attack. The aircraft was further damaged but with skill he succeeded in bringing it back to its base. Flight Lieutenant Constance by his cheerfulness and courage has been an inspiration to his fellow aircrews.

CORBEIL, F/O Joseph Laurent (J18330)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Home in Montreal; enlisted there 16 September 1940. Trained at No.1 WS (graduated 3 March 1941) and No.6 BGS (graduated 18 August 1941). Award presented 28 June 1947.

This officer has displayed great skill and tenacity and has participated in attacks on many vital targets in Germany and enemy occupied territory. He has an outstanding record of accurate bombing and has set a fine example to all. His devotion to duty has been of a very high order.

CROUCHER, F/L Gordon (J26857)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Verdun, Quebec; enlisted Montreal, 7 July 1942. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 19 April 1943) and No.6 BGS (graduated 31 May 1943). Killed in action, 28/29 July 1944 (Lancaster LL687); name on Runnymede Memorial. No citation in AFRO; DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded 31 July 1944. WOP/AG and Squadron Signals Leader. Had served in Canada one year, overseas one year.

Flight Lieutenant Croucher has been with this squadron for several months and has been leading the Signals Section with very great efficiency. Operationally he is exceptionally keen and an inspiration to all serving with and under him. His cheerful good nature combined with his untiring energy have made his section an exemplary one.

CURTIS, Sergeant Clayton (RAF 1000250)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 March 1942. Born at Rock Ferry, 1921; home in Borough, Birkinhead (local government officer); enlisted May 1940. No citation published in London Gazette other than “for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations” (Air Ministry Bulletin 6484). Flight, 26 March 1942 published the following citation:

As Wireless Operator/Air Gunner this airman has participated in raids against heavily defended industrial centres and dockyard installations. These attacks were pressed home with great determination. Recently Sergeant Curtis attacked a tanker near Emden, and in spite of heavy opposition, scored a direct hit from a height of only 20 feet. This airman has performed excellent work and he has played a good part in the successes obtained.

This airman commenced his operational tour in August 1941. As wireless operator/air gunner he has participated in raids against highly defended industrial centres and dockyard installations. These attacks were pressed home with great determination. Recently, Sergeant Curtis attacked a tanker near Emden and, in spite of heavy opposition, scored a direct hit from a height of only 20 feet. This airman has performed excellent work and he has played a good part in the successes obtained.

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DE ZORZI, F/O Santy Joseph (J16690)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945. Born 1913 in Italy; home in Toronto; enlisted in Hamilton, 16 October 1940. Trained at No.1 AOS (graduated 25 June 1941) and No.1 BGS (graduated 22 August 1941). Commissioned 1943.

As navigator, this officer has completed numerous sorties including such targets as Mannheim, Cologne and Essen. His ability has been outstanding and throughout he has displayed great keenness and zeal. He has played a worthy part in the successes obtained.

DECHER, F/O Karl Alfred (J16052)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 19 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 30 June 1944 and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Born 1918 in West Kitchener, Ontario; home in Kitchener, Ontario; enlisted in Hamilton, 16 September 1940. Trained at No.5 BGS (graduated 21 July 1941) and No.2 WS (graduated 23 June 1941). Commissioned 1942. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/9015 has recommendation dated 8 April 1944 when he had completed 25 sorties (219 hours 19 minutes) as a Bomb Aimer, 30 May 1942 to 19 February 1944:

Flying Officer Decher has been engaged on operational duties from May 1942 until February 1944, during which time he has carried out an extremely varied tour, consisting of nine sorties in anti-submarine patrol, on one of which he attacked a U-Boat. The remainder of his trips comprise numerous attacks against targets in the Ruhr and also several to Berlin.  As a Bomb Aimer he has, at all times, performed his duties in an efficient manner, with great keenness and devotion to duty. I strongly recommend that this officer be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

DIMMA, FS Thomas William (R96009)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 17 November 1943 as per London Gazette dated 23 November 1943 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. Born 1922 in Ontario. Home in Ottawa; enlisted there 24 April 1941. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 28 February 1941) and No.2 BGS (graduated 14 August 1942). Presented to next of kin 12 December 1944. Killed in flying accident, 24 March 1944 at No.22 OTU (Wellington RF732); buried in UK.

As rear gunner, Flight Sergeant Dimma has participated in a large number of sorties involving attacks on a wide variety of targets. He has displayed commendable courage and devotion to duty and has proved himself to be a most dependable member of aircraft crew. On several occasions his timely warnings and skilled evading directions have enabled his pilot to outmanoeuvre enemy fighters.

DOWIE, F/L Charles Stuart (J6008)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 29 July 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942 and AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942. Born 1914 in Leader, Saskatchewan; home there; enlisted in Saskatoon, 9 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.6 EFTS, and No.4 SFTS. Commissioned 1941. Posted to No.426 Squadron from No.26 OTU on formation (20 October 1942). Invested with DFC by the King, 8 December 1942.

This officer has completed a large number of sorties involving attacks on targets both in Germany and German occupied territory. He is a skilful and determined pilot who has achieved success against heavily defended targets. His courage in the face of enemy fire has set an inspiring example.

DUNGEY, P/O Elmer Burton (J17742)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 November 1943 as per London Gazette dated 19 November 1943 and AFRO 166/44 dated 28 January 1944. Born 20 May 1915 in Alliston, Ontario; home in Collingwood, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 5 June 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 19 December 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 5 March 1942) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 3 July 1942). Commissioned 1943. Shot down 3 July 1943, he was the last man to bale out (whole crew survived); he and one other crewman were hidden by Belgian underground. He escaped via France and the Pyrenees to Spain, took a boat to Gibraltar and made it back to England. Postwar he ran a bakery and worked in real estate. Died in Toronto, 30 May 1996.

This officer has completed very many sorties involving attacks on a wide range of important and well defended targets. He is a skilful and determined pilot whose fine record has been worthy of high praise. His coolness and courage in the face of the enemy have greatly inspired his crew.

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EASTON, S/L John Franklin (J9549)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 October 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born 1919 in Timmins, Ontario; home there. Served in Army. Enlisted at North Bay, 12 May 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 20 August 1941), No.11 EFTS (graduated 15 Octoerr 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942).

This officer has completed a large number of sorties, many of them against objectives deep in German territory. He has on all occasions pressed home his attacks with great determination, obtaining many valuable photographs. On two of his sorties his aircraft was severely damaged by enemy fighters, but each time he has completed his mission and brought the crippled bomber back to base. The cheerful and inspiring leadership of Squadron Leader Easton has been a great asset to his squadron.

ELLISON, F/O Phillip Patrick (J18370)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born in Outlook, Saskatchewan, 191; home in Saskatoon (farmer, cashier). Served in Royal Canadian Artillery. Enlisted in Saskatoon, 21 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 24 January 1941) and No.3 BGS (graduated 26 May 1941). Commissioned 1943. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy, in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.2818 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 18 March 1945 when he had flown 56 sorties (376 hours 45 minutes) undertaken in two tours – 16 October 1941 to 23 November 1942 (36 trips, 248 hours 50 minutes) and 30 November 1944 to 11 March 1945 (20 trips, 127 hours 55 minutes). The first tour included two trips to Trondheim to bomb Tirpitz (27 and 28 April 1942) and a 12 hour 30 minute sortie to the Kattegat (8 June 1942), presumably to lay mines. The first tour was in turn of two parts – one from British bases (ending with the operation of 8 June 1942) and the other from North African bases (starting 4 July 1942 and consisting of 19 sorties, ten of them against Tobruk). Died in Saskatoon, 13 April 1995.

Flying Officer P.P. Ellison recently engaged in his 56th operational sortie, thereby completing his second operational tour. Throughout his lengthy period on operations this officer has displayed exceptional ability as a tail gunner, and at all times has shown marked keenness to engage the enemy. His logbook records attacks on targets on targets in North Africa, Crete, and many attacks on heavily defended German targets, such as Kiel, Cologne, Essen, Dusseldorf, and Chemnitz. He also participated in an attack on the battleship Tirpitz which drew the highest praise from the Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Bomber Command.  It is considered that Flying Officer Ellison has fully earned recognition for his services by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross (Non-Immediate).

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FARROW, Sergeant James Phillip (NZ 402136)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 February 1942. Born in Gisborne, Auckland; home there (lorry driver); enlisted July 1940. Air Ministry Bulletin 6289 refers. Incident occurred 21/22 January 1942; two of crew died and third seriously wounded. Missing (prisoner of war ?), 17 June 1944.

One night in January 1942 this airman was the pilot of an aircraft which bombed Emden. The aircraft was subsequently attacked and badly damaged by the fire from two enemy fighters. Sergeant Farrow received a slight wound in the leg, and the remaining members of the crew were seriously wounded. In the face of a harassing situation Sergeant Farrow ordered the crew to abandon aircraft.  Unaware that his message had not been received, as the intercommunication system had broken down, and believing himself to be alone in the aircraft, he finally evaded his attackers and set an approximate course for England. Flying the badly damaged aircraft on a dark, moonless night, and with no instruments to aid him, Sergeant Farrow eventually reached this country where he made a safe landing with the undercarriage retracted. By his skill and resolution he saved both his aircraft and, unknowingly, his wounded crew. This airman has always shown courage and tenacity worthy of high praise.

FAULDER, F/L John Murray (J22749)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 8 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 1920 in Cockermouth, Cumberland, England (letter from Douglas G. Faulder dated 22 June 1997). Home in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Former militia service (King’s Own Rifles). Enlisted in Regina, 29 October 1940. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 27 February 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 22 May 1942), and No.4 SFTS (graduated 11 September 1942). Commissioned in 1942. No citation other than “..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 4 September 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (137 hours five minutes), 9 April to 30 August 1944.

Flying Officer Faulder has completed a very large number of operations against the enemy. On many of these sorties he penetrated deep into Germany to bomb such heavily defended targets as Friedrichshafen and Karlsruhe. Throughout his tour, this officer has displayed a fine offensive spirit and great keenness to participate in all operations against the enemy. On all occasions he pressed home his attack with great determination and seldom returned without an excellent picture of the aiming point attacked.  Flying Officer Faulder by his cheerful determination and operational ability has set a splendid example to this whole squadron. Therefore, I recommend that he be awarded a non-immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

FERGUSON, P/O Douglas Coutts (J16467)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 7 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943 and AFRO 1078/43 dated 11 June 1943. Born Saskatchewan 1921. Home in Weyburn. Enlisted Regina, 14 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 7 February 1941), No.1 BGS (graduated 7 June 1941), No.1 AOS (graduated 26 April 1941) and No.1 CNS (graduated 8 July 1941). Commissioned 1942.

Since joining this squadron, Pilot Officer Ferguson has displayed skill, courage and determination and throughout his tour of duty has been of great assistance to his captain. By his coolness in the most adverse situations he has led his pilot to targets, which have included Berlin, Cologne, Essen and Turin, with great efficiency and keenness. His skill and determination in action have been an inspiration to his crew.  Since coming to this squadron in April 1942, Pilot Officer Ferguson has carried out sorties on targets in Germany against the heaviest enemy defences. These operations included sorties to: GARDENING (12), Essen (2), Bremen (1), Karlsruhe (1), Wilhelmshaven (1), Nuremburg (1), Rostock (1), NICKEL (1), Moline (1), Hamburg (1), Berlin (1), Cologne (2), St.Nazaire (2), Saarbrucken (1), Turin (1), Essen (1).  He has led his pilot into targets with a great determination and cool judgement and thus brought back several pictures of the target showing a fine record of achievement. Throughout his tour, he has been a very efficient navigator and his skill and determination in action has been an inspiration to other members of his crew.

This was minuted on 22 March 1943 by G/C C.R. Dunlap, Officer Commanding, Station Leeming:Pilot Officer Ferguson has shown great skill, courage and determination, and throughout his tour has been a great aid to his captain by his coolness during adverse conditions. His efficient navigation has prove to be an inspiration to his crew mates and I heartily endorse this recommendation for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.  On 29 March 1943 A/V/M G.E. Brookes, Air Officer Commanding, No.6 Group, added his remarks:A good type of junior officer and doing excellent work. Recommend the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

FERGUSON, P/O Stephen (J92240)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 1915, Manchester, England. Home Niagara Falls, Ontario, furnaceman. Enlisted Hamilton, 28 December 1942. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 26 November 1943). Commissioned October 1944. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.2818 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 23 March 1945 when he had flown 34 sorties (181 hours 45 minutes) between 1 August 1944 and 3 March 1945.

Pilot Officer Ferguson, as mid-upper gunner on four-engined bombers, has completed a tour of operations against the enemy. His last nine sorties had to be put in as a spare gunner, but in spite of the length of his tour, this officer constantly displayed a fine fighting spirit and a keen sense of duty. He participated in attacks on many heavily defended targets including Hanover, Magdeburg, Stuttgart and Cologne. In view of his excellent example and fine operational record, Pilot Officer Ferguson is strongly recommended for the award of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

FERNIHOUGH, F/O Ross John (J388737)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Born in York, Ontario, 1913; home in Hamilton (fountain manager); enlisted there 5 August 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 10 July 1943) and No.1 AOS (graduated 10 December 1943). Commissioned 1943.

Flying Officer Fernihough’s outstanding ability, coolness and courage have earned him the admiration of his fellow crew members. His efficiency has been responsible for the completion of many successful operations. He has acted as deputy navigator leader in a satisfactory manner. His navigational skill has enabled his aircraft to return safely to base on numerous occasions, when it has been menaced by enemy anti-aircraft fire and fighters.

FERRIS, W/C William Donovan Swanzey (C1351)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 16 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 28 May 1943 and AFRO 1187/43 dated 25 June 1943. Born in Edmonton, 1911; home there. Educated in Edmonton and Victoria. Attended University of Alberta (engineering), 1930-31. North-West Territories traffic manager for Mackenzie Air Service before the war. Enlisted in Edmonton, 6 November 1939. Trained at No.1 SFTS (graduated 13 July 1940).

This officer has undertaken numerous sorties, including attacks on such heavily defended areas as Emden, Berlin, Essen, Cologne, and others. He has displayed fine leadership, great courage and skill, setting a most inspiring example. On one occasion, with Stettin as the objective, locomotives and searchlight positions were machine-gunned in the course of the flight. On two occasions his aircraft has been illuminated by searchlights whilst over the target but, in spite of this, Wing Commander Ferris executed successful attacks.

NOTE: DHH file RG.24 Volume 20627 has original recommendation drafted by G/C C.R. Dunlap, 7 May 1943 when he had flown 16 sorties (99 hours 26 minutes) and was much more detailed:Wing Commander Ferris has carried out 16 operational sorties during which some of the most heavily defended enemy targets have been attacked.  Wing Commander Ferris has been in command of No.408 (RCAF) Squadron since September 1942, and during this period by his forceful and energetic efforts he has built up a squadron which is second to none in keenness, skill and determination. In recognition of his achievements in this regard, he is held in a position of great esteem and admiration by those who serve under his command.  He is at his best during periods of stress and misfortune. His able leadership has pulled the squadron through some trying experiences; his coolness and leadership on such occasions has a most stabilizing and elevating influence; his trip to Stettin on April 20th, 1943, and also his trip to Dortmund on May 4th, 1943, were made when the fortunes of the squadron were at a low ebb; his outstanding performance on these two occasions once again elevated the spirit of the squadron to its normal high level. Both targets mentions were successfully attacked, but neither sortie was without incident. On the former the trip was made at tree-top level, and the tail gunner was afforded several opportunities of shooting up trains and searchlights. On the latter, shortly after the release of the bombs the aircraft was picked up by searchlights for nearly 15 minutes, in spite of violent evasive action accompanied by great loss of height. On the trip to Berlin on March 1st, 1943 he had a similar and even more trying experience with searchlights, this time being coned on successive occasions for a period totalling more than 20 minutes. In spite of the fact that this coning necessitated two additional operational climbs, Wing Commander Ferris was quite unperturbed and pressed on to his objective which he attacked successfully.

I consider that Wing Commander Ferris is truly deserving of this recognition, and have no hesitation in strongly recommending the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

FINCH, F/L Edward Thomas (J25226)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 30 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1916, Brantford, Ontario. Home there. Enlisted in Hamilton, 28 May 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 24 September 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 22 November 1941) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 29 March 1942. Commissioned March 1943. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 22 May 1945 when he had flown 36 sorties (223 hours five minutes) between 15 September 1944 and 22 March 1945.

Flight Lieutenant Finch completed an operational tour of 36 trips against the enemy as pilot and captain of aircraft on four-engined bombers. All these sorties were over Germany and thirty of them were against major targets. Throughout his tour this officer proved himself to be cool, experienced and determined, regardless of whatever opposition he encountered.  During a raid on Bochum on the night of October 9, his aircraft was attacked four times by night fighters, but the target was bombed successfully. A few days later, on October 12th, he made a daylight attack on Weine Eickel. Flak was particularly severe on this sortie, but the crew received a target token for visual bombing. The crew earned another target token on December 24th when they took part in a daylight raid on Dusseldorf airfield. Other important targets recorded in his log book are Chemnitz, Kiel, Magdeburg, Karlsruhe, and Stuttgart.  Flight Lieutenant Finch also filled the position of Deputy Flight Commander for several months with entire satisfaction, earning the respect and admiration of the personnel of this squadron.

FISHER, F/L Gordon Clayton (J4690)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 November 1942 as per London Gazette dated 24 November 1942 and AFRO 1962/42 dated 4 December 1942.  Born in St.Boniface, Manitoba, 1913; home in Regina. Enlisted in Regina, 26 June 1940.  Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 16 September 1940), No.1 AOS (graduated 8 December 1940, No.1 BGS (graduated 18 January 1941), and No.1 ANS (graduated 12 March 1941).  Shot down over Belgium with crew of W/C Twigg’s aircraft, 28/29 August 1942.  Evaded capture and, with F/L Van der Bok, made Gibraltar (see unit ORB entry of 2 October 1942).  Long interview held in DHist biographical file.    Died in Ottawa, 4 April 1988.

In August 1942, Flight Lieutenant Van Den Bok and Flight Lieutenant Fisher were wireless operator air gunner and navigator, respectively, of an aircraft detailed to attack Saarbrucken.  On the return flight the bomber was attacked by enemy aircraft, sustaining much damage.  Flight Lieutenant Van Den Bok, who was wounded in the leg by a piece of shrapnel, and Flight Lieutenant Fisher displayed outstanding courage, determination and fortitude.  Both have completed many sorties and have invariably displayed similar qualities.

FISHER, F/O John Edwin (J24228)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born in Toronto, 1923; home in Leaside; enlisted in Toronto, 28 April 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 7 November 1942) and No.9 AOS (graduated 5 March 1943).  Commissioned 1943.  No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.”  DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation of W/C J.F. Easton dated 4 November 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (151 hours 50 minutes), 9 April to 25 September 1944.

Flying Officer Fisher has completed an operational tour as navigator on four engined bombers in an exemplary manner.  He has navigated his aircraft successfully to such targets deep in Germany as Dortmund, Aachen, Wesselling, Kiel, Stuttgart, Hamburg and Brest.  On all occasions he has navigated with exceptional skill.  Several times when his aircraft was shot up and in difficulties, Flying Officer Fisher’s resourceful and skilful navigation was largely responsible for the safe return to base of his aircraft.  More recently against precision targets requiring the utmost in navigation skill and accuracy, Flying Officer Fisher has taken his aircraft accurately to the target.  By his exceptional keenness and his coolness in operations against the enemy, Flying Officer Fisher inspired his crew with great confidence, and his efforts throughout his tour have been a very large contributing factor to the great success achieved by his crew.

FITZGERALD, F/O Robert Edward Joseph (J15898)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 2 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born at Windsor, Ontario, 1922; home in Amhertsburg. Enlisted in Windsor, 22 April 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 25 July 1941) and No.6 BGS (graduated 29 September 1941). Commissioned 1942.

As air gunner, Flying Officer Fitzgerald has completed two tours of operational duty. He has at all times displayed the highest standard of keenness for air operations and most of his assignments have necessitated flights to attack heavily defended targets. On many occasions his vigilance and timely warnings have enabled his pilot to evade enemy fighters. Flying Officer Fitzgerald has proved himself to be an invaluable member of aircraft crew.

FOSTER, Flight Sergeant Donald (RAF 547325)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 February 1942. Born in Cleethorpe, 1918; home in Hull (clerk); enlisted 1937 as wireless operator. Air Ministry Bulletin 6298 refers. Citation published in Flight, 26 February 1942.

This airman has participated in a large number of sorties as Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. He has taken part in raids which have included Lille, Hamburg, Mannheim and Dusseldorf. His wireless duties have invariably been carried out with skill and judgement. During daylight raids on Lille in September, Flight Sergeant Foster used his guns with good effect and assisted materially in repelling enemy fighters who attempted to attack the formation. He has always shown courage and devotion to duty.

FRANKLIN, F/L Elliott Maynard (J14038)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born 1920 in Digby, Nova Scotia; home there. Enlisted in Digby, 2 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 27 January 1941), No.11 EFTS (graduated 29 March 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 20 June 1941). Commissioned 1942. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 1 July when he had flown 32 sorties (166 hours 32 minutes), 20 January to 17 July 1944. Name given as Elliott Maynard Claude Franklin.

Flight Lieutenant Franklin has completed a large number of sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany, including several to Berlin. On all his sorties he has shown a fine offensive spirit and his photographs of the target have been excellent, many indicating hits on the actual aiming point.Flight Lieutenant Franklin, through his cheerfulness and excellent leadership, combined with his splendid operational record, has set an inspiring example to his crew and to the squadron as a whole. Therefore, I recommend that he be awarded a non-immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

FRANKLING, F/O George Reginald (J25781)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 13 April 1945 and AFRO 824/45 dated 18 May 1945. Born 1918 in Winnipeg; home in Windsor, Ontario. Educated in Winnipeg and University of Toronto; insurance clerk. Ex-RCA. Enlisted in Winnipeg 5 January 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 9 October 1942), No.7 EFTS (graduated 1 January 1943) and No.6 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Commissioned May 1943. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 6 December 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (160 hours 45 minutes), 4 July to 1 November 1944.

Flying Officer Frankling has completed a tour of operations on four-engined bombers in an exemplary manner. He has operated over such heavily defended targets as Stuttgart, Essen and Duisburg. By pressing home his attacks with keen determination he has been responsible for bringing home many excellent aiming point photographs.  Flying Officer Frankling has set an example to other members of the squadron by his keenness to participate in attacks against the enemy at all times. His cheerfulness and courage were outstanding during his tour, and I therefore recommend him for the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

FRANKLING, F/L Samuel Roy (J5046)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 14 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. Born 8 May 1919, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Home in Muskoka, Ontario (mill operator and miner). Enlisted in Toronto, 9 September 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 15 December 1940), No.1 EFTS (graduated 28 January 1941), and No.1 SFTS (graduated 28 April 1941). Commissioned 1941. No citation other than “in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations”. DHist file 181.009 D.1513 (RG.24 Vol.20600) had recommendation for an immediate DFC dated 23 August 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (147 hours 31 minutes). Flight Commander.

Squadron Leader Frankling has completed a very large number of sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany. Throughout his tour, he has displayed a fine offensive spirit, pressing home all his attacks with coolness and great determination no matter how heavy were the defences encountered. On nearly all his sorties he brought back pictures of the actual aiming point attacked and he has proven conclusively to all that as an operational pilot he is exceptional.  As a Flight Commander on this squadron, Squadron Leader Frankling has imparted to those serving under him much of his own operational skill and keenness, and by his untiring efforts, has won the praise of all in any way connected with him.[/tab]

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GALL, F/L Robert (J20725)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Born 1922. Enlisted Edmonton 12 August 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 3 January 1942), No.15 EFTS (graduated 28 March 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 14 August 1942). No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 18 April 1945 when he had completed 32 sorties (207 hours) between 6 November 1944 and 4 April 1945.

Flight Lieutenant Gall has recently completed an operational tour on four-engined bombers as pilot and captain of aircraft. At all times this officer has displayed the highest degree of efficiency, courage and determination to successfully complete each mission. he has participated in many raids far into Germany, including attacks on Chemnitz, Magdeburg and Bohlen.On one occasion he pressed home his attack on Cologne with but three serviceable engines. Indicative of Flight Lieutenant Gall’s ability is the fact that on two occasions he was selected to lead aircraft concentrations during daylight raids on German targets…

GALLOWAY, Sergeant Joseph Edgar (R64480)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 26 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1942 and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Born 1915 Milton, Ontario. Enlisted 22 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 13 October 1940), No.2 WS (graduated 14 February 1941), and No.4 BGS (graduated 16 March 1941).

Sergeant Galloway has taken part in attacks on Rostock, Cologne, Kiel, Manheim, Bremen, Duisberg, and Saarbrucken. He has also been engaged on many mining operations. He is one of the most outstanding wireless operator/air gunners in his squadron and has always performed his duty with conspicuous skill. His high standard of efficiency and devotion to duty have contributed much to the successes achieved.

GATTEY, F/L Heath Boulton (J15529)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943 and AFRO 2138/43 dated 22 October 1943. Born in Manitoba, 1920. Enlisted in Calgary, 1 July 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 22 November 194), No.3 BGS (graduated 8 July 1941), No.5 AOS (graduated 24 May 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 6 August 1941).

Early in his tour of operational duty this officer, flying as a navigator and bomb aimer, took part in many very successful sorties from which a number of excellent photographs were secured. The targets included Berlin, Rostock and many other vital objectives in the Ruhr. Latterly as squadron navigation officer he has navigated his aircraft to and from various enemy objectives with great skill in the face of heavy defences.

GIBLIN, F/O Deryck Worthy Trevor (AUS 403405)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943. Born in Sydney, 1922; home there; enlisted 1941; trained in Australia and Canada (No.3 Wireless School, Winnipeg and No.2 Bombing and Gunnery School, Mossbank); commissioned 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 11391 refers.

Since joining this squadron in June 1942, Pilot Officer Giblin has carried out operations against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany. These operations included the following: Mining, Duisburg (3), Hamburg, Saarbrucken, Dusseldorf (2), Elbe River, Mainz, Osnabruck, Flensburg, Gardening Frisiens (2), Lorient, Cologne, Wilhelmshaven, St.Nazaire, Berlin, Munich, Stuttgart, Essen, Kiel, Frankfurt, Le Creusot.

Throughout these operations, Pilot Officer Giblin has displayed great courage and has set up a fine record of achievement. Through his cheerful manner he has shown a fine offensive spirit and has inspired a high standard of morale in his crew.

GILMORE, S/L Edward Gerard (C1036)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 6 April 1943 and AFRO 809/43 dated 7 May 1943. Born in Toronto, 1913; home there. Enlisted in Toronto, 1 August 1939. Cited with Sergeant J.W.T.M. Smith (RAF, awarded DFM). Killed in action with No.408 Squadron, 5 April 1943 (Halifax BB336); name on Runnymede Memorial.

One night in February 1943, Squadron Leader Gilmore and Sergeant Smith were captain and bomb aimer respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack Cologne. Whilst over the target area the aircraft was subjected to heavy anti-aircraft fire and sustained much damage. The aircraft went out of control and considerable height was lost before Squadron Leader Gilmore regained control. The bomber was riddled by shell splinters and one of his propellers was shot away, two compasses were rendered useless and all navigational charts were lost. Nevertheless, Squadron Leader Gilmore flew the damaged bomber to an airfield near the coast, having received valuable assistance from Sergeant Smith, who by use of the bomb sight compass, displayed skilful navigation.

GLOVER, F/O William Vaughan Alexander (J37162)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 1917 in Norwood, Manitoba; home in Peterborough, Ontario (postmaster); spent two years in Royal Canadian Artillery. Enlisted in Toronto, 12 August 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 14 May 1943) and No.4 AOS (graduated 15 October 1943). Commissioned October 1943.

Flying Officer Glover has taken part in many operational sorties. He has at all times displayed courage in the face of the enemy and his outstanding navigational skill has on several occasions materially contributed to the safe return of his aircraft to base. In September 1944 he was navigator of an aircraft detailed for an attack against Kiel. Shortly after taking off the aircraft collided with a bird and the windscreen was broken. Disregarding the intense cold and gale which swept through the bomber, this officer remained in his exposed position and navigated the aircraft safely to the target and back to base.

GRANT, Sergeant Abram Emerson (R54561)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Home in Prescott, Ontario; enlisted in Montreal, 21 May 1940. Mechanic; no citation.

GRAYSON, FS Harold Lewis (R68020)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 16 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 625/45 dated 13 April 1945. Born in London, Ontario, 1908; home there; enlisted there 17 June 1940. In late March 1943, following a raid on Berlin, he was one of a seven man crew that parachuted from 600 feet over Sweden.

As flight engineer this airman has taken part in very many sorties involving attacks on such targets as Berlin, Hamburg and various centres in the Ruhr area. He has at all times displayed a high standard of skill and has proved himself to be a cool and resolute member of aircraft crew. His fearlessness and strong sense of duty have set an excellent example.

GUINN, F/O Melvin Wilbert (J18397)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 1920 in Staughton, Saskatchewan; home in Regina (registrar, clerk). Enlisted in Regina, 19 February 1941. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 26 May 1941) and No.5 BGS (graduated 7 November 1941). Commissioned 1943. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 27 March 1945 when he had flown 46 sorties (283 hours 45 minutes) in two tours – 25 June 1942 to 8 March 1943 (26 trips, 155 hours 50 minutes) and 30 October 1944 to 11 March 1945 (20 trips, 127 hours 50 minutes).

Flying Officer W. M. Gilbert Guinn has completed a large number of operational sorties against the enemy, some of them over the most heavily defended targets. This officer has recently completed his second tour, and throughout his long period of operations, he has maintained a very high standard of skill in wireless operating. His excellent spirit and keenness to operate have been a constant source of inspiration to new arrivals on the squadron. Flying Officer Guinn’s keenness was never relaxed in spite of the fact that he went through a crash in which he was the sole survivor. In addition he has proved to be a most able assistant to his signals leader.

GUYATT, Flight Sergeant Peter Raymong George (RAF 906482)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per LondonGazette dated 1 January 1943. Electrician.

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HALES, S/L Frank William (J6498) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 22 August 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2274/44 dated 20 October 1944. Born in Camrose, Alberta, 1918. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there 8 November 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 14 March 1941), No.7 EFTS (graduated 4 May 1941) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 30 July 1941).

This officer has displayed great skill and gallantry in air operations. He has completed very many sorties during which he has attacked successfully such targets as Berlin, Freidrichshafen and Dortmund. On one occasion whilst over an enemy target his aircraft caught fire, sustaining extensive damage before the flames could be extinguished. Despite this, Squadron Leader Hales executed an accurate bombing attack and afterwards flew the damaged bomber to base. He has proved himself a most inspiring leader.

HANSEN, P/O Lloyd Leonard Hans (J18692) – Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. Home in Lethbridge; enlisted in Calgary, 23 July 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 11 April 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 19 June 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 9 October 1942). No citation in AFRO which gives unit only as “Overseas”. DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 25 October 1943 (when he was an NCO) which identifies unit and says:

Flight Sergeant Hansen has completed nine sorties to some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany, and has shown himself to be a very commendable captain of aircraft. On the night of 18th October 1943, Flight Sergeant Hansen’s aircraft was found to be short of petrol just after leaving the target. For his journey home, he took precautionary measures immediately and carried out economical endurance flying, attempting to make a landing in England. Correct wireless emergency procedures were carried out and Air Sea rescue had the aircraft plotted all the way from the enemy coast. On arriving at the English coast two engines on one side cut due to lack of petrol, so Flight Sergeant Hansen turned back to sea and ditched his aircraft. All members of the crew were saved owing to the use of correct dinghy drill.

HANSON, F/L James Robert (J15599) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 10 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 23 May and AFRO 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944. Born in England, 1918; educated in Montreal. Enlisted in Montreal, 15 April 1940. Wife in Montreal. Trained at No.4 BGS (graduated 23 October 1940) and No.1 WS (graduated 24 November 1940). Commissioned 1942. No citation other than “…completed…may successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Killed in action 22/23 May 1944 (Lancaster LL723); name on Runnymede Memorial. Public Records Office Air 2/9149 has recommendation dated 14 February 1944 when he had completed 35 sorties (189 hours seven minutes) in two tours (27 July 1941 to 16 September 1942 and 20 April 1943 to 15 February 1944) as follows:

Flight Lieutenant Hanson is now engaged on his second tour of operations. His operational experience includes a large number of sorties against heavily defended targets.

In his capacity as Squadron Gunnery Leader, Flight Lieutenant Hanson has set an example of devotion to duty which has been a source of inspiration to all. His cheerful attitude towards his duties and his unrelenting efforts to raise the standard of gunnery have contributed in no small manner towards the success achieved by the squadron.

HARDINGHAM, F/O Raymond Joseph (J4691) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 29 July 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942 and AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942. Born in London, England, 8 November 1912; home in Kingswood, Surrey. Enlisted in Halifax, 26 June 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 16 September 1940), No.1 AOS (graduated 8 December 1940), No.1 BGS (graduated 18 January 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 12 March 1941). Commissioned 26 February 1941. Proceeded overseas, 8 April 1941; promoted to Flying Officer, 25 February 1942; to Flight Lieutenant, 20 August 1942; to Squadron Leader, 14 May 1943; to Wing Commander, 15 April 1944. Repatriated to Canada, 10 January 1946; released 29 January 1946.

Flying Officer Hardingham has participated in numerous sorties, many of them penetrating into enemy territory and ten in bad weather. In an attack on the Scharnhorst at sea, Flying Officer Hardingham dived down to 500 feet before releasing his bombs. His aircraft was damaged by the defender’s fire but his subsequent navigation contributed to the safe return of his aircraft. This officer has proved a source of encouragement to inexperienced navigators.

HARLOW, P/O Robert Grant (J87953) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born in Prince Rupert, British Columbia; home in Prince George. Enlisted in Vancouver, 23 January 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 17 July 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 23 October 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1943). Commissioned 1944. No citation other than “completed… numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 7 November 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (135 hours 25 minutes), 16 June to 23 October 1944.

Pilot Officer Harlow has completed a very large number of sorties as pilot in four engined bombers. He has attacked successfully such heavily defended targets in Germany as Sterkrade, Hamburg, Duisburg, Dortmund and Essen. On all his sorties he has shown a fine offensive spirit, pressing home his attacks with keen determination, ignoring all defences the enemy had to offer, and obtaining excellent photographs of the objective. More recently, on tactical targets, he has more than once descended far below the safe bombing height in order to make certain that his bombs went on the target.  Pilot Officer Harlow has, by his cheerful nature and aggressiveness, been an inspiration to his crew and a fine example to the squadron.

HARPER, F/O Owen James (C19525) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born 1916 in Winnipeg; home there. Enlisted in Winnipeg, 28 December 1940. Commissioned 1943. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 14 October 1944 when he had flown 36 sorties (196 hours 20 minutes), 29 May 1943 to 13 September 1944.

Flying Officer Harper has completed a tour as flight engineer on four-engine bombers in an exemplary manner. During his tour he flew to many heavily defended targets deep in Germany, such as Berlin, Nuremburg and Frankfurt. On all occasions he displayed great courage and a cool disregard for any defences the enemy had to offer.

As a engineer, Flying Officer Harper is exceptional. On more than one occasion his complete disregard for his job and speedy reaction to any warning signs have saved the aircraft in which he was flying from damage or destruction. At all times he showed exceptional keenness to participate in operations and he set a splendid example of courage and efficiency to the whole squadron. Therefore I recommend that he be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (Non-Immediate).

HARPWOOD, F/O George Albert (J86802) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 1915 in Woodstock, England; home in Welland, Ontario (machinist). Enlisted in Hamilton, 7 March 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 11 September 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Commissioned 1944. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation by W/C F.R. Sharpe dated 1 March 1945 when he had flown 31 sorties (161 hours five minutes), 23 July to 4 December 1944.

Pilot Officer Harpwood has now completed a tour of operations against the enemy on heavy bombers. He has flown over many heavily defended targets in enemy territory such as Kiel, Sterkrade, Duisburg, Cologne and Wanne-Eickel.

He has been an excellent captain of aircraft and has compiled a most creditable operational record. At all times he has been most keen to participate in attacks against the enemy and has set a fine example to the rest of his crew members by pressing on even under adverse conditions. His courage and cheerfulness were outstanding during his tour and I therefore recommend him for the award of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

HARRIS, F/L Thomas William (RAF 37878)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per LondonGazette dated 15 October 1943. Born in London, 1921; home there; enlisted 1941. Trained in Canada (No.9 BGS and No.1 CNS); commissioned 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 11720 refers. The following citation is from AFRO 2610/43 dated 17 December 1943

As bomb aimer, Flight Lieutenant Harris has, throughout tour of duty, shown fine enthusiasm for operations. The success of many sorties has been due to his perseverance and courage in the face of heavy enemy opposition. His sorties have included raids on Berlin, Hamburg and Essen and several minelaying missions. This officer has a long record of successful work and has helped considerably in maintaining the excellent spirit of his crew.

HARRISS, S/L Baylis Earle (RAF 121788)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 August 1943. Born in Galveston, Texas, 1915; home there; commissioned 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 11124 refers.

Since joining this squadron in February 1943, Squadron Leader Harriss has carried out 25 operational sorties against heavily defended enemy targets. On the night of 13th May 1943, the aircraft in which Squadron Leader Harriss was captain was attacked by two enemy night fighters. Due to his skilful maneouvering, the rear gunner was able to destroy one enemy night fighter and his own aircraft sustained no damage.

This officer is a skilful pilot whose example of determination and devotion to duty has been inspiring. He has rendered excellent service, contributing materially to the high standard of operational efficiency of the squadron. I consider that his splendid record fully merits the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

HART, F/O Arthur George Thomas (RAF 178924)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945. Born 1920 in Westham; home there; educated Holborn Road Elementary School; enlisted July 1940; commissioned June 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 18305/AL.1007 refers. No published citation other than “completed operations with courage and devotion to duty”.

HARVEY, P/O John Douglas (J85081) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 19 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1296/44 dated 16 June 1944. Born in Swansea, Ontario, 7 August 1922; home there. Enlisted in Toronto, 7 November 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 10 April 1942), No.10 EFTS (graduated 19 June 1942) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 9 October 1942). Commissioned 1944. Folloing the war he attended the University of Toronto, then rejoined the RCAF. Participated in photo operations in northern Canada; became a staff officer in Public Relations (Ottawa, Montreal and Metz) and rose to rank of Wing Commander. Retired in 1965; executive director of the RCAF Association and a founding editor of Airforce magazine. Author of Boys, Bombs and Brussels Sprouts, The Tumbling Mirth, and Laughter-Silvered Wings. Prominent character in The Valour and the Horror (TV documentary and Senate hearings). Died in Victoria, 16 January 1998.

This officer has participated in very many sorties, involving attacks on most of the enemy’s heavily defended targets. He has invariably displayed great skill and courage and his example in pressing home his attacks has been worthy of much praise. In the course of his tour, Pilot Officer Harvey has attacked Berlin on eleven occasions.

HARVEY, P/O Roger Charles (J87004) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born 1919 in New Westminsyer, British Columbia; Formerly in New Westminster Regiment. Enlisted in Vancouver, 2 September 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 22 January 1942), No.7 AOS (graduated 24 May 1942), No.3 BGS (graduated 18 July 1942) and No.1 ANS (graduated 5 September 1942). Commissioned 1944. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 7 November 1944 when he had flown 34 sorties (155 hours 15 minutes), 9 April to 12 September 1944.

Pilot Officer Harvey has completed a tour of operations as navigator on four engined bombers in an exemplary manner. On many of these sorties he navigated with great accuracy to such heavily defended targets in Germany as Sterkrade, Aachen and Freidrichshafen, and on all occasions showed a cool disregard for any defences the enemy had to offer. On several occasions, Pilot Officer Harvey has navigated his aircraft to distant targets without the assistance of special equipment, yet by superior navigation he guided his aircraft to the target.

As a navigator, Pilot Officer Harvey has proven himself to be superior and with his cheerful disregard for any difficulties, was an inspiration to his crew. His splendid navigation fully warrants him the award of a Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

HEAVEN, F/L Ernest Arthur (J23082) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Born at Grand Forks, British Columbia; home there (miner). Enlisted Vancouver, 11 February 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 4 June 1941), No.15 EFTS (graduated 27 July 1941) and No.11 SFTS (graduated 7 October 1941). No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 22 May 1945 when he had flown 30 sorties (195 hours 45 minutes) between 26 November 1944 and 23 April 1945.

Flight Lieutenant Heaven has completed a tour of operations as pilot and captain of aircraft on four-engined bombers. Throughout his tour this pilot has shown admirable squadron spirit and a keenness for operations. Many of his sorties were against the most heavily defended German targets, including such names as Cologne, Stuttgart, Essen, Chemnitz, and Hamburg. During an operation on Soest, he was attacked by an enemy fighter but successful evasive action was taken. On another raid on Cologne, his aircraft suffered extensive flak damage. Notwithstanding any of the difficulties which he encountered, Flight Lieutenant Heaven’s operational enthusiasm never diminished. This officer also performed excellent work as Deputy Flight Commander and he was a real asset to this unit.

HEXEMER, LAC Edgar Oscar (R100504) – Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron (No.62 Base in AFRO) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. No citation in AFRO; DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded 31 July 1944. Fitter IIE, Home in Lancaster, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 19 March 1941. Served 11 months in Canada, 28 months in UK.

This airman who is much older and more mature than his crew has at all times during operations shown an utter disregard for physical discomforts. His courage and devotion to duty have been a guide to his team mates and he has set a magnificent example to all who have come in contact with him.

HICKEY, FS (now P/O) Keith Alexander (R193797/J94915) – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Born 1919 in Cobourg, Ontario; home in Highland Creek, Ontario (clerk). Enlisted Toronto, 24 September 1940. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 18 September 1942) and No.1 AOS (graduated 25 February 1944. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 18 April 1945 when he had completed 14 sorties (96 hours 40 minutes), 14 February to 8 April 1945.

As navigator on four-engined aircraft, this NCO’s operational record to date is considered highly deserving of recognition. On one operational trip in particular, during an attack on Kiel [NOTE – not listed in his sorties on this form], Flight Sergeant Hickey did an exceptional trip of navigation. Before reaching the target, all navigational aids became unserviceable or were unreliable. In spite of this, two good fixes were obtained, one before the target and one after the target.

A manual air plot was kept going during the whole of the trip, and the accuracy of same was good. Maximum use was made of this air plot. When he finally was able to determine his position accurately he used an ingenious method to waste time, and in doing so succeeded in arriving on the target only 1/3 a minute early. During the whole trip he displayed extreme coolness, good judgement and quick thinking, and showed exceptional navigation ability.

This navigator, by his keenness and cool judgement, has been a source of inspiration to his crew, and an example to his fellow navigators…

HITCHCOCK, P/O Harold Arthur (RAF 120853)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942. Born in Catford, London, 1920; home at Lee, London; commissioned from the ranks, April 1942. No citation published other than “for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations”. Air Ministry Bulletin 8119 refers.

This officer has proved himself to be a most successful navigator. Operating in all kinds of weather and against most of the main targets in Germany and German occupied territory, his determination to achieve success has been outstanding. He has invariably pressed home his attacks whatever the opposition.

HOGAN, FS John Alexander (R67582) – Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron (No.62 Base in AFRO) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Windsor, Ontario. No citation in AFRO but DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 31 July 1944; NCO in charge of “B” Flight, No.408 Squadron; enlisted in Windsor, Ontario, 25 June 1940; had served 17 months in Canada, 31 months in UK.

This senior Non-Commissioned Officer, despite physical discomforts and fatigue, has been especially from “D” Day on a shining example to all who worked with him, always doing more than his share and ever ready to assist other members of his crew.

HOWARD, F/O Marshall Earl (J22203) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 August 1944 and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944. Born in Mitchell, Ontario, 1922; home there. Enlisted in Hamilton, Ontario, 25 September 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 23 March 1942) and No.8 AOS (graduated 3 August 1942). Commissioned 1942. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation dated 15 May 1944 when he had flown 25 sorties (160 hours 35 minutes), 9 July 1943 to 27 April 1944.

Flying Officer Howard has completed one tour of operations with this squadron. He has navigated his aircraft on many occasions to distant targets in Germany including five trips to the Ruhr, four to Hamburg, eight to Berlin and several others to southwest Germany.  In all of these sorties the crew with whom he flies has achieved considerable success and this is in no small manner attributable to Flying Officer Howard’s skill as a navigator. As Deputy Navigation Leader of the squadron, he has at all times set a high standard of navigational skill, and his cheerful attitude and devotion to duty have been an inspiration to all.

HUMPHREY, 2nd Lieutenant Marcus Rice (USAAF O-886209)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – award approved 12 June 1944 as honourary award to an American national and not published in London Gazette. From Nebraska. Citation in DHist file 181.009 D.3051 (National Archives of Canada RG.24 Vol.20634).

As captain of aircraft this officer has participated in many sorties against the enemy’s most heavily defended targets including eleven against Berlin. His outstanding ability, courage and cheerfulness have contributed largely to the successes achieved and the high standard of morale maintained by the squadron.

On January 5th, 1944, 2nd Lieutenant Humphrey was captain of an aircraft detailed to bomb Stettin. On the outward journey, while still about 100 miles from the target, one of his engines failed. Nevertheless,, despite the fact that he was losing height with his bombs still aboard, this captain continued with his mission and released his bombs over the primary. He thereafter brought the aircraft safely home to this country. It is considered that his decision to press home his attack under these conditions is worthy of a commendatory endorsement.

HUNTER, WO Arthur Richardson (R68534) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 9 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 26 June 1942 and AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942. Born in Fort William, Ontario, 1917; home there. Was a bookkeeper and stenographer prior to enlistment. Enlisted at Fort William, 29 June 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.3 AOS, No.2 BGS (graduated Mossbank, 19 January 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated at Rivers, 12 March 1941). NOTE: Is second name “Richards” or “Richardson” ?

This observer has participated in numerous sorties, three of which have been in daylight. He also took part in the attack on the Renault Works in Paris. In addition he has laid mines in enemy waters. Warrant Officer Hunter has shown exceptional skill and ability as navigator and his determination and devotion to duty have contributed to the success of his operational sorties.

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/8755 has recommendation dated 23 April 1942 and sortie list which are more detailed; compiled when he had flown 34 sorties (182 hours ten minutes).

This observer has taken part in 34 operational sorties involving 182 hours flying. Included in these sorties are three in daylight. He has attacked several targets in the Ruhr area, and participated in the attack on the Renault Works in Paris. In addition, he has laid mines in enemy waters. During his tour of duty he has shown exceptional skill and ability as navigator, and by his determination and devotion to duty he has contributed very materially to the success of several operational sorties.

HURD, P/O Eric James (C18877) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 6 June 1944 and AFRO 1660/44 dated 4 August 1944. Born in Sawyerville, Quebec, 1920; home there. Enlisted in London, England, 27 March 1942. Commissioned 1943. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/8780 has recommendation by W/C D.S. Jacobs dated 23 February 1944 when he had flown 24 sorties (159 hours nine minutes), 24 July 1943 to 15 March 1944.

Pilot Officer Hurd has nearly completed his first tour of operations. As a navigator he has been responsible for directing his aircraft on many occasions to very distant targets in enemy territory, including over eleven trips to Berlin. He has at all times displayed great keenness and devotion to duty. I strongly recommend that this officer be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

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INNES, Sergeant John Alexander (RAF 991149)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 November 1944. Born 1916 at Wick, Caithness; home there (bank clerk); enlisted 1940. Air Ministry Bulletin 16190/AL.914 refers.

As flight engineer this airman has participated in many sorties. He has displayed commendable skill and courage and has proved himself to be a worthy member of aircraft crew. On his last sortie, Sergeant Innes was wounded whilst over Hamburg. Although in much pain he remained at his post until the mission was completed. Not until leaving the aircraft after it had been landed in England did he mention his injuries. He set a fine example of fortitude and devotion to duty.

Sergeant Innes has completed a very large number of sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany. As an engineer he was exceptionally efficient and on more than one occasion he was responsible for saving the aircraft in which he was flying from destruction.On his last trip, Sergeant Innes was badly wounded by a cannon shell from an enemy fighter over Hamburg. Undaunted by this he stuck cheerfully to his duties till the aircraft had landed safely and only mentioned his wounds after leaving the aircraft.This brave action, together with his splendid record of long and efficient service fully warrant in my opinion an award of the non-immediate Distinguished Flying Medal.

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JARVIS, F/L Alfred John George (RAF 110950)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 April 1943. Born at Islington, England, 1915; home in Bushey, Herts.; educated at St.Marks School. Enlisted 1940; commissioned 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 10029 refers.

The first half of this officer’s operational tour was done as Wireless Operator Air Gunner on Hampden aircraft, where he has shown commendable courage and devotion to duty. Since this squadron’s conversion to Halifax’s, Flight Lieutenant Jarvis has acted in the capacity of Squadron Gunnery Leader and through his untiring efforts has achieved a very high standard in the squadron’s Gunnery Section, at the same time carrying out the last twelve of his operational sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany, showing exceptional qualities and leadership, courage and skill and setting a fine example to other crews.

JOHNSON, F/O Robert Earl (J23885) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. American in the RCAF; born 1919 in Boulder, Colorado; home there (lineman). Enlisted in Windsor, Ontario, 19 December 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 20 June 1942), No.10 EFTS (graduated 9 October 1942) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 19 February 1943). Commissioned 1943. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 1 February 1945 when he had flown 33 sorties (161 hours 15 minutes), 7 August to 28 December 1944.

Flying Officer Johnson has completed a tour of operations on heavy bombers as pilot. During his tour he has flown over many heavily defended targets such as Kiel, Sterkrade, Dortmund and Duisburg.  Throughout his tour he has at all times displayed a fine offensive spirit and has pressed home his attacks with exceptional coolness and determination. On each and every occasion he has been more than anxious to come to grips with the enemy and his conduct on operations has been exemplary.

JONES, F/O Harlo Lloyd (J25886) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. Born 1923 at Dinsmore, Saskatchewan; home there; enlisted in Saskatoon, 10 April 1942. Commissioned 1943. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 23 October 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 1 January 1943) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). No citation other than “completed… numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 1 January 1945 when he had flown 33 sorties (163 hours 50 minutes), 23 June to 4 December 1944.

Flying Officer Jones has completed a tour of operations against the enemy on four-engined bombers. He has operated deep into the heart of Germany on many occasions and has been over such heavily defended targets as Hamburg, Kiel, Brest, Duisburg and Essen.  At all times he has pressed home his attacks and procured many fine photographs of the various targets. He has been a source of inspiration to his crew members by his capability and guidance, which in turn have reflected on the squadron as a whole.  Flying Officer Jones’ courage and cheerfulness throughout his tour have been outstanding and I therefore recommend that he be awarded the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

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KAYE, S/L Thomas Chisholm (50584)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943. Born in Winnipeg, 1916; home in Manitoba. Educated at Lord Roberts High School and Kelvin Technical High School, Winnipeg. Served in Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, 1935, before enlisting in Royal Air Force, 17 January 1939; commissioned 26 November 1942. Began as a fitter, servicing Hampdens; re-mustered to pilot, 1940 and trained at Carberry, Manitoba; returned to a British OTU where he was flying Hampdens. As of 22 July 1944 he was reported as having served 35 months in Canada and 32 months in Britain. Transferred to RCAF in London, 9 January 1945 and awarded AFC (see RCAF awards data base). Remained in postwar RCAF, serving in Search and Rescue (western Canada), No.408 Squadron, inspector and investigator with Directorate of Flight Safety, and at Portage la Prairie. DFC presented 23 November 1943. DFC citation published in Flight, 17 June 1943:

This officer has piloted aircraft in face of intense enemy opposition to most heavily defended targets in Germany including Dusseldorf, Bremen, Wilhelmshaven and Cologne…also participated in attacks against targets at Lorient, St.Nazaire and Turin and has secured excellent photographs…has always displayed great courage, skill and determination…Under a calm, quiet manner he has a fine fighting spirit which inspires confidence in his crew.

KEARL, F/L Eldon Eastham (J18810) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 26 January 1944 as per London Gazettedated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1920 in Cardston, Alberta; home there (tailor); enlisted in Edmonton, 5 September 1941. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 14 February 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 25 April 1942) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 6 November 1942). Overseas in December 1942. Commissioned 1943. Clippings in file say that on a raid on Dusseldorf his aircraft was severely damaged by a Ju.88; on another sortie he eventually landed with one engine still running. Killed in action 27/28 January 1944 (Lancaster DS709); buried in Germany. Award presented to next of kin, 10 December 1947.  This officer has completed as pilot and captain of aircraft many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.

KENNEDY, F/O Donald MacRae (J19578) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 27 March 1945 and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born 1917 in Dural, Saskatchewan; home in Regina (educated at University of Saskatchewan; teacher); enlisted in Regina, 9 July 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 28 October 1941), No.2 EFTS (graduated 30 January 1942) and No.11 SFTS (graduated 19 June 1943). Medal presented 21 August 1948. Commissioned January 1944. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 10 December 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (185 hours 55 minutes). He had been in the Middle East and India in June 1943, making eleven flights of which four were considered as “sorties” (total of 46 hours 20 minutes on these eleven trips; he may have been on transport work). Second tour was 28 sorties, 23 June to 16 November 1944.

Flying Officer Kennedy has completed a tour of operations on heavy bombers in exemplary manner. He joined the squadron in June this year after spending some time in India.  He has flown over many heavily defended targets deep into Germany such as Kiel, Sterkrade, Duisburg and Dortmund, and has always brought his crew and aircraft back to base.  Flying Officer Kennedy has been an inspiration to his crew and other personnel of the squadron by his cheerful disregard of any or all defences the enemy had to offer. At all times he has been aggressive in pressing home his attacks and returning with many good aiming point photographs.  His fine operational record is a credit to himself and his squadron, and I therefore strongly recommend that he be awarded the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

KNIGHTS, P/O John Kingsley (J16251) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 7 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943 and AFRO 1078/43 dated 11 June 1943. Born in Strathmore, Alberta, 1916; home in Calgary; enlisted there 6 November 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 May 1941), No.5 EFTS (ceased training, 23 May 1941), No.2 BGS (graduated 27 October 1941), No.3 AOS (graduated 15 September 1941) and No.1 CNS (graduated 25 November 1941). Invested with award by King George 23 November 1943. Killed in action, 14 February 1945 (Lancaster PB183, No.405 Squadron) on his second tour; name on Runnymede Memorial.

Since joining this squadron Pilot Officer Knights has taken part in attacks against some of the most heavily defended targets in enemy territory. These operations include sorties to Cologne, Dusseldorf, Lorient, Essen, Bremen, Hamburg and Turin, amongst others. Invariably this officer has shown a fine fighting spirit and courage of the highest order. At all times his efficient navigational skill and judgment have been an inspiration to the other members of his crew.  Throughout his tour, this officer under a calm, quiet manner has shown a fine fighting spirit, skill and initiative. He has led his pilot into these targets so as to bring back several very good pictures, showing a fine record of achievement. He has always been an efficient navigator and through this has been an inspiration to other members of his crew.

KLEIN, F/O Gerald (RAF 134205)Distinguished Flying Cross – No. 408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943. Born in London, 1921; home in Eastcote, Middlesex; commissioned 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 11391 refers.

Pilot Officer Klein having carried out his first tour on Wellingtons, is completing his second tour on this squadron. He has carried out operations against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany, namely Dusseldorf, Gardening (2), Bochum, Dortmund, Essen, Wuppertal (2), Le Creusot, Krefeld, Gelsenkirchen.

At all times, Pilot Officer Klein has taken great interest in his work and has been very energetic towards helping organization and keeping a high standard of proficiency on the squadron. By a cheery manner and self-confidence he has inspired a high standard of morale in his crew and is completing a high record of achievement.

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LAINE, F/L Sven Roy Walfrid (J18786) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 9 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 22 February 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Born in Fort William, Ontario, 1921; home in Port Arthur. Enlisted Geraldton, Ontario, 12 July 1941. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 13 March 1942), No.2 EFTS (graduated 19 June 1942) and No.12 SFTS (graduated 23 October 1942). Commissioned 1943.

This officer has taken part in very many sorties, including ten against the German capital. He is a skilful and resolute captain, whose fine fighting qualities have impressed all. On a recent occasion whilst over Brunswick his aircraft was hit and it caught fire. Coolly and skilfully, Flight Lieutenant Laine overcame a difficult situation and then pressed home his attack with great determination. His great skill and resolution in trying circumstances contributed largely to the success of the sortie.

LANKTREE, F/O Brian Dane Joseph (RAF 151600)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944. Home in Argentina; commissioned 1943; trained in Canada at No.6 BGS and No.9 AOS. Air Ministry Bulletin 16587/AL.940 refers. No published citation other than “completed operations with courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Volume 20603) has recommendation dated 4 September 1944 when he had flown 25 sorties (119 hours nine minutes), 24 March to 28 August 1944.

Flying Officer Lanktree has completed as navigator of a four engined bomber, a very large number of sorties against the enemy, many of them deep penetrations to very heavily defended targets in Germany. On all occasions Flying Officer Lanktree has displayed outstanding ability as a navigator. On two occasions, when the aircraft in which he was flying was badly shot up by enemy fighters, he carried on with great confidence and managed to fight their badly damaged aircraft back to base.

Flying Officer Lanktree, through his skill and operational keenness, has set a magnificent example to all members of the squadron. Therefore, I recommend that he be awarded a non-immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

LAPIERRE, WO (now P/O) Joseph Jean Baptiste Gaston (R148486/J85664) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 13 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2052/44 dated 22 September 1944. Born in Montreal, 1923; home in Verdun (mechanic); enlisted Montreal, 22 January 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 30 December 1942). Medal presented 30 September 1946.

As air gunner, Warrant Officer Lapierre has completed a large number of sorties, including nine attacks on Berlin. On one occasion, after successfully bombing the German capital, Warrant Officer Lapierre sighted a fighter closing in. He promptly gave his pilot the necessary evading directions but the bomber was struck by a burst of machine gun fire. His turret was damaged and he was deprived of the use of the inter-communication system. The lead of his oxygen supply was also severed. Nevertheless, this resolute gunner finally drove off the attacker. Displaying exceptional devotion to duty he manned his post throughout the remainder of the flight despite the lack of oxygen. He set an example of a high order.

LEECH, Sergeant Donald Sparkes (RAF 1254044) Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1942. Citation found in Flight, 21 January 1943. Born in Manchester, 1912; home at Leigh-on-Sea, Essex (costing clerk); enlisted 1940. Air Ministry Bulletin 8793 refers.

Sergeant Leech has displayed a keen and fine fighting spirit. Serving as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, he has taken part in attacks against Wilhelmshaven, Hamburg, Essen, Cologne, and other heavily defended areas in enemy territory. He has also flown in mine laying operations and has consistently exhibited outstanding ability, great courage and devotion to duty.

LEHMAN, F/L William Herbert (J21460) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945 and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945. Born 1920 in Camper, Manitoba; home in Whitemouth, Manitoba (miner). Enlisted Winnipeg, 16 September 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 23 May 1942), No.7 BGS (graduated 9 October 1942) and No.5 AOS (graduated 9 October 1942). Commissioned 1942. No citation other than “in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy”. DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 23 March 1945 when he had flown 49 sorties (296 hours) in two tours – 25 March to 5 October 1943 (29 trips, 117 hours 10 minutes) and 30 October 1944 to 11 March 1945 (20 trips, 118 hours 50 minutes).

Flight Lieutenant Lehman has now completed his second tour of operations against the enemy. Throughout this lengthy period, this officer has continuously displayed a high degree of skill, resolution and tireless devotion to duty. There are few important targets in Germany that Flight Lieutenant Lehman has not attacked during his numerous sorties, some of the most recent ones being Cologne, Essen, Dusseldorf, and Chemnitz. His example has been a credit to his squadron and a real asset to his crew…

LEITCH, Warrant Officer David Duncan Patrick (RAF 921693)Member, Order of the British Empire – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 May 1946. Born 1921 in Bangor, County Down; home in Bristol; enlisted April 1940. Air Ministry Bulletin 21747/AL.1124 refers.

Warrant Officer Leitch was the navigator of a Halifax aircraft which was badly damaged by enemy fire and had to be abandoned on the night of 10 March 1943. The crew baled out and Warrant Officer Leitch landed near Vassy, France. He destroyed his charts and disposed of his parachute and harness. Disguised in old clothes taken from a scarecrow, Warrant Officer Leitch obtained food and clothing from residents of Ville-en-Blaisois and with further help reached Ambrinville on 14 March 1943 where he was captured. He was taken to a military prison in Paris and thence to Dulag Luft, Oberusel. Warrant Officer Leitch made his first attempt to escape on 20 June 1943 from a train while being taken from Stalag Luft III to Stalag Luft VI. He left the train through a lavatory window but was recaptured after travelling nearly 100 miles in another train towards the Baltic coast. His next attempt was made in February 1944, again from a train in which he was being transferred from one camp to another. After two hours of liberty he was discovered and was returned to the Prisoner of War train. On 22 March 1944 Warrant Officer Leitch once more escaped from a train. He made contact with some French workers who took him to their camp. They assisted him to take the identity of a French worker, providing him with a forged identity card and a written authority to travel to Danzig where he hoped to board a Swedish ship. With coolness and resource he reached Danzig but was recaptured when trying to board a vessel there. Notwithstanding his previous failures, Warrant Officer leitch made preparations for another attempt to escape early in April 1944 with the aid of Army and Navy personnel of Stalag XXB but before the plan could be put in effect the Germans reorganized the defences. On discovering that the Germans were wiring the windows of the barracks about the end of April 1944, Warrant Officer Leitch decided to make another attempt without delay and broke out of the camp wearing civilian clothes. He remained at large until 8 June 1944 when he was recaptured. He was eventually liberated by the Allied forced at Velson [Belson ?] on 16 April 1945.

LENNOX, P/O William Ben (J85378) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 August 1944 and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944. Born in Toronto, 1923; home there. Enlisted in Toronto, 26 May 1941. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 23 October 1942). Commissioned 1944. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation dated 15 May 1944 when he had flown 25 sorties (159 hours nine minutes), 9 July 1943 to 27 April 1944.

Pilot Officer Lennox has completed a tour of operations on this squadron as an Air Gunner. He has taken part in many sorties to distant targets in Germany. These included six trips to the Ruhr, four to Hamburg, eight to Berlin and several others to southwest Germany. In all these sorties the crew with whom he flies has achieved considerable success, attributable in no small manner to Pilot Officer Lennox’s skill as a gunner. On several occasions he has given his captain accurate advice in taking evasive action against enemy night fighters, and in this manner has avoided serious damage to his aircraft. He has at all times set a high gunnery skill and his keenness, cheerful attitude and devotion to duty have been exemplary.

NOTE: In supporting this recommendation on 16 May 1944 the Commanding Officer of Station Linton (Group Captain C.L. Annis) wrote of the gunner’s role in Bomber Command:

A bomber crew’s duty is to avoid engagement with enemy fighters in order that the main purpose of bombing the enemy objective and returning safely to base may be accomplished. I consider that P/O Lennox has thus distinguished himself in skill and devotion to duty while operating deep in enemy territory throughout a complete tour. I heartily endorse this recommendation for the award of the DFC.

LITTLEWOOD, Sergeant Leslie (RAF 992167)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 March 1942. Born in Sheffield, 1919; home in Whiston. Air Ministry Bulletin 6484 refers. No citation in London Gazette other than “for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations”. Killed in action, January 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin gives citation. (see also Flight, 26 March 1942).

This airman has participated in attacks on Mannheim, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Ostend and other important targets. In the course of one operation his aircraft was attacked by two enemy fighters but Sergeant Littlewood assisted greatly in driving off the attackers. He is a hard and conscientious worker and his skill as a wireless operator has contributed materially to the successes achieved.

LIWISKI, P/O Peter Edward (J85597) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1919 at Gilbert Plains, Manitoba; home there (teacher). Enlisted in Winnipeg, 19 May 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 October 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 5 March 1943). Commissioned March 1944. Repatriated 19 September 1944). No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 16 August 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (149 hours 12 minutes), 30 January to 20 July 1944. Medal sent by registered mail, 20 March 1951. NOTE: Name later changed to “Lewis”.

Pilot Officer Liwiski has completed an operational tour on four-engined bombers. He has successfully navigated his aircraft to many targets deep into Germany, including three to Berlin and others to Stuttgart, Frankfurt and Essen. On all occasions he navigated with great skill and the excellence of his work was a very large contributing factor to the outstanding success achieved by his crew. The very fact that the aircraft in which he flew was so seldom hit by flak or attacked by fighters indicated the very high standard of track-keeping and navigation he attained. Pilot Officer Liwiski, by his cheerful tenacity and operational keenness, greatly inspired and set a splendid example to all navigators in the squadron.

LUMGAIR, WO Robert Oliver (R86155) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 November 1943 as per London Gazette dated 19 November 1943 and AFRO 166/44 dated 28 January 1944. Born in Thornhill, Manitoba, 1919; home there (farmer); enlisted Winnipeg, 20 December 1940. Trained at No.1 BGS (graduated 8 November 1941) and No.1 WS (graduated 12 October 1941).

As air gunner, Warrant Officer Lumgair has taken part in a large number of sorties involving attacks on industrial centres in the Ruhr and many other targets of importance. He is a most conscientious member of aircraft crew whose vigilance and skill have played a good part in the successes obtained. During an operation against Hanover in October 1943, his aircraft was attacked by a fighter. In the ensuing combat Warrant Officer Lumgair displayed excellent judgement in directing the necessary evading tactics, afterwards using his guns to such good effect in unison with the rear gunner that the attacker was shot down in flames. His efforts contributed materially to the success of the sortie.

LUSSIER, Sergeant (now F/O) Kenneth Edward (R204124/J85500) – Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Born 1924 in Ottawa; home there (clerk). Trained at No.9 BGS. Commissioned April 1944. Served in postwar RCAF; killed on flying operations, 25 April 1952 (20428 F/L K.E. Lussier, DFC). Unit identified in AFRO only as “Overseas”; proper unit identified in DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Box 2067). DHist file 181.009 D.1763 (RG.24 Vol.20610) has recommendation for a Non-Immediate DFC dated 5 April 1945 when he was an Flying Officer with No.420 Squadron. He had by then flown 32 sorties (206 hours 45 minutes), with two trips on 24 February 1944 and 25 February 1944; the balance were 4 November 1944 to 25 March 1945. This may have been the basis of the MiD, although the short time lapse from date to recommendation to date of gazetting suggests otherwise. The recommendation form gives sorties as 31 and 32; the first (24 February 1944) was an early return which may explain the discrepancy.

This officer has participated in 31 operational sorties which included some very heavily defended targets such as Schweinfurt, Augsburg, Karlsruhe, Hanover, Saarbrucken, Magdeburg, Essen, Cologne, Hamburg, Munster and Chemnitz. Wile on his second trip to Augsburg, February 25th, 1944, his crew ran into trouble near the target. One engine failed going into the target, one failed coming out and when over France, the third engine failed. This officer bailed out with the other members of the crew and evaded the enemy for some days, finally making contact with the Marquis, returning to England after a month in enemy territory. He was crewed up again and completed his tour of operations with 420 Squadron.

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MAGUIRE, P/O John Norman (J94106) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 1924 in Toronto; home there (clerk); enlisted there 14 January 1943. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 26 November 1943) and No.3 BGS (graduated 12 March 1944). Presented 22 June 1949.

In November 1944, during an attack on Dusseldorf, the aircraft in which Pilot Officer Maguire was rear gunner was attacked by enemy fighters. By his alertness and timely warnings he enabled his pilot to evade all attacks successfully. This officer has consistently displayed courage and devotion to duty of a high order.

MAIR, W/C Alexander Campbell (C1635) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 9 December 1943 as per London Gazette dated 24 December 1943 and AFRO 297/44 dated 11 February 1944. Born in Darvel, Scotland; home in Brantford, Ontario; enlisted in Windsor, Ontario, 29 January 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS and No.1 SFTS (graduated 13 July 1940. Commissioned 1940 Instructed at Saskatoon before going overseas. Killed in action, 27 November 1943 (Lancaster DS723); no known grave; name on Runnymede Memorial. DFC presented to next-of-kin by Governor General, 27 June 1945.

This officer has participated in very many sorties involving attacks on a wide variety of important and well defended targets in Germany. Throughout his tour he has displayed great skill and determination, pressing home his attacks with vigour, often in the face of heavy opposition. On several occasions his aircraft has been damaged by enemy action but despite this, Wing Commander Mair has completed his mission successfully. He is a highly efficient flight commander whose gallant leadership and personal example have inspired all.

MAITLAND, F/O Ian (RAF 81408)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942. Born in Knapsdale, Argyllshire, 1904; home in Appin. Commissioned 1940. Missing, 28 August 1942. No citation published other than “for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations”. Air Ministry Bulletin 7711 refers and has the following text:

This officer has participated in many sorties, many of them against targets deep in enemy territory. He has taken part in repeated attacks on Rostock and such heavily defended areas as Kiel, Hamburg, Essen, Huls and other targets in the Ruhr. As wireless operator, Flying Officer Maitland has rendered valuable service in assisting in the safe return of his aircraft in bad weather.

During attack on Huls in October 1941, his aircraft was attacked by three enemy fighters, but Flying Officer Maitland’s vigilance and skilful directions enabled his captain to outmanoeuvre attackers. On a number of occasions he has extinguished, by machine gun fire, concentrations of searchlights which were holding his aircraft. Twice at Rostock, from a height of a few hundred feet, he shot up airfield adjoining the Heinkel works and set a number of buildings on fire. His courage and efficiency as squadron gunnery officer have had a beneficial effect upon the standard of gunnery of the squadron.

MARMENT, Flight Sergeant Maurice (NZ 41922)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 April 1943. Born in Wellington, New Zealand, 1919; home in New Zealand (clerk); enlisted 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 9816 refers.

On the night of the 11th March 1943, while returning from Stuttgart, his aircraft was attacked by a night fighter and immediately his starboard outer and port inner engines were put out of commission. This was 150 miles south of the French coast. He made his way out of enemy territory on two engines, crossing the English coast at Rye, and forward heavy effort to make base in Yorkshire. When over the Midlands, one of his good engines showed signs of packing up where he carried out a successful belly landing. His aircraft was practically riddled with bullet holes. His ability to make instantaneous decisions in emergency, skilful pilotage and cool judgement contributed largely to the success of this operational flight.

MARTIN, F/O Byron Le Verne (J86185) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Born 1919 in Port Arthur, Ontario; home there (labourer); enlisted there 15 July 1941. Trained at No.3 WS (graduated 30 July 1942) and No.8 BGS (graduated 31 August 1942). Medal presented 22 February 1947.

Flying Officer Martin has completed a successful tour of operations which has included attacks against such heavily defended targets as Kiel, Hamburg, Duisburg and Essen. He has proved himself to be a keen and skilful wireless operator. On the return flight from a mission against Essen in November 1944, a dinghy which had been adrift in the English Channel for four and a half hours was sighted. Flying Officer Martin promptly sent accurate information to a headquarters in England. This was maintained for nearly an hour until the petrol supply of his aircraft was running low. Owing to the exactness of the information sent the crew were rescued half an hour later by a destroyer. The splendid co-operation, determination and devotion to duty displayed by this officer have been most commendable.

METHERAL, P/O Kenneth James (J15683) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 26 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1942 and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Born in Rosetown, Saskatchewan; 1917; home in North Edmonton, Alberta; enlisted in Edmonton, 22 March 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 3 January 1941), No.3 AOS (graduated 28 April 1941), No.3 BGS (graduated 8 June 1941) and No.1 CNS (graduated 22 July 1941). Commissioned June 1942. Medal presented at Buckingham Palace 23 March 1943.

As navigator this officer has taken part in many
sorties including such heavily defended targets as Bremen, Wilhelmshaven, Hamburg, Essen and Cologne. He has also completed many mine-laying operations. His outstanding skill, extensive knowledge and determination have contributed materially to the successes achieved.

MILES, S/L Harold Thomas, DFC (J6946) – Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 10 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 23 May 1944 and AFRO 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944.

 

This officer, now on his second tour of operational duty, has taken part in a large number of sorties including attacks against some of the enemy’s most distant and heavily defended targets. An outstanding captain of aircraft he has always performed his duties in a cheerful and efficient manner while as a flight commander Squadron Leader Miles has led his formation with determination, skill and courage.

MINHINNICK, F/L Stuart Harry (J26761) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born 1913 in Esterhazy, Saskatchewan; home in Vancouver; enlisted in London, Ontario, 16 March 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 24 October 1942), No.20 EFTS (graduated 5 February 1943) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 28 May 1943). Commissioned 1943. Medal delivered by hand, 7 August 1949.

One night in September 1944, Flight Lieutenant Minhinnick captained an aircraft detailed to attack Volkel airfield. When crossing the enemy coast the aircraft was damaged by anti-aircraft fire. Although one engine was put out of action, Flight Lieutenant Minhinnick continued to the target and executed a most determined attack. He set a fine example of devotion to duty. Flight Lieutenant Minhinnick has completed many sorties against well defended targets and has invariably displayed a high degree of courage and resolution.

MORRISON, P/O Samuel Richard (J85734) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Born in Toronto, 1920; home there; enlisted there 24 July 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 1 February 1942), No.10 EFTS (graduated 10 April 1942), No.6 or 8 SFTS (ceased training 14 August 1942) and No.3 BGS (graduated 31 July 1942). Commissioned 1944. Medal presented 22 June 1949.

This officer has completed two tours of operations in the role of rear gunner and has displayed great coolness and skill. On several occasions his vigilance and well directed combat manoeuvres have enabled his pilot to evade enemy fighters. He has proved himself to be a brave and devoted member of aircraft crew.

MOWATT, F/O Everett Annand (J27871) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 1918 at Chipman, Nova Scotia; home in New Richmond, Quebec (clerk); enlisted in Moncton, 24 May 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 19 December 1941), No.21 EFTS (graduated 21 February 1942) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 19 June 1942). Commissioned 1943. Medal sent by registered mail 28 June 1949. No citation other than “completed… numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Col.20600) has recommendation dated 23 February 1945 when he had flown 29 sorties (166 hours), 3 September 1944 to 16 January 1945.

Flight Lieutenant Mowatt has now completed a tour of operations on four-engined bombers and has penetrated deep into the heart of enemy territory on many occasions. He has flown over such heavily defended targets as Duisburg, Osnabruck, Kiel and Sterkrade.

Throughout his tour he has displayed exceptional courage and fortitude. Always ready to come to grips with the enemy and never lacking in esprit de corps, he has set a splendid example as a pilot to all members of the squadron. Towards the last of his tour he has acted as Deputy Flight Commander and in that capacity has been superior.

MOYER, P/O Ronald Claus (J16247) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 7 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1943 and AFRO 1035/43 dated 4 June 1943. Born at Beamsville, Ontario, 1918; home there; enlisted in Hamilton, 28 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 17 March 1941), No.1 BGS (graduated 3 August 1941), No.1 AOS (graduated 19 June 1941) and No.1 CNS (graduated 5 September 1941). Commissioned 1942. DFC and Bar presented 9 April 1948.

 

The operations against the enemy, in which this officer has participated, include attacks against many highly defended targets such as Essen, Berlin and Hamburg. He has also taken part in mine-laying operations and sea searches over enemy waters. Pilot Officer Moyer has frequently led his pilot to the target with cool judgement and determination and has secured photographs, displaying a fine record of successful bombing. His efficiency in navigation, together with his courage and devotion to duty, have been an inspiration to the other members of his crew.

Since joining this squadron in February 1942, Pilot Officer Moyer has acted as navigator on aircraft on 30 offensive sorties over enemy territory. These operations included Gardening in several different enemy waters, and also to the following heavily defended enemy targets in face of intense enemy defences:- Rennes (1), Hamburg (2), Sea Search (1), Flensburg (1), Lorient (4), Cologne (1), Berlin (1), Dieppe (2), Dusseldorf (2), Duisburg (1), Kassell (1), Turin (1), St.Nazaire (1), GARDENING (3), Osnabruck (1), Frankfort (2), Bremen (1), Wilhelmshaven (3), Essen (1).

He has led his pilot into these targets with cool judgement and determination so as to bring back several pictures of the target, thus displaying a fine record of achievement. He has at all times carried out a high grade of efficiency in navigation, and through his courage, skill and determination in action has been an inspiration to the other members of his crew.

 

MOYER, F/L Ronald Claus, DFC (J16247) – Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) had recommendation for a DSO dated 11 November 1944. By then he had flown 51 sorties (277 hours ten minutes). First tour described above; second tour was 6 June to 2 November 1944 (21 sorties, 104 hours 15 minutes). Incidents of 4 February 1943 (Turin) and 8 June 1944 (Mayenne) noted.

 

Flight Lieutenant Moyer has shown himself to be a brilliant navigator. On two of his operational sorties his navigational equipment was rendered unserviceable. On both occasions it was due to his outstanding skill that his aircraft and crew were saved. He has participated in many operations against major targets in Germany. Throughout his present tour he has acted as a navigation leader in which capacity he has set a high example of leadership and crew co-operation. His cheerful courage and unfailing devotion to duty have won the admiration of all.

MULLIGAN, F/L Eric Harold (J16708) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 6 November 1943 as per London Gazette dated 12 November 1943 and AFRO 2610/43 dated 17 December 1943. Born in Pembroke, Ontario, 1920; home in Sudbury, Ontario (apprentice mechanic); enlisted in Ottawa, 16 December 1940. Commissioned 1943. Medal presented at Buckingham Palace 11 August 1944. No citation in AFRO other than “completed many successful operations against the enemy in which [he] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1513 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation by W/C W.D.B. Ferris dated 18 September 1943 when he had flown 17 sorties (108 hours 30 minutes), 6 September 1942 to 24 July 1943. Flight Engineer Leader; returned from Berlin 1 March 1943 with 78 holes in aircraft.

Since joining the squadron in September 1942, Flight Lieutenant Mulligan has carried out operations against heavily defended targets in Germany. These sorties included the following: Duisburg, Frankfurt, Dusselldorf, Wilhelmshaven, Essen (two), Saarbrucken, Flensburg, Lorient, Turin, Cologne (two), Berlin, Kiel, Stettin, Dortmund, Hamburg.  Flight Lieutenant Mulligan has at all times set a very good example to his fellow Flight Engineers in the capacity of a leader. He has carried out two conversions on the squadron, keeping a high standard of efficiency amongst his men. Under a cheerful manner he has inspired a high standard of morale, and I strongly recommend that this officer be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

McCAFFREY, P/O John Harold Alexander (J86046) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 28 July 1944 as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1946 and AFRO 244/46 dated 8 March 1946. Born 1921 at Melville, Saskatchewan; home there; enlisted Saskatoon, 27 December 1940. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 10 October 1942), No.19 EFTS (graduated 5 December 1942), and No.11 SFTS (graduated 16 April 1942). Commissioned April 1944. Medal presented to next of kin, 10 December 1947.Killed in action 28 July 1944; no known grave.

Throughout his operational tour Pilot Officer McCaffrey has attacked a variety of heavily defended targets in Germany. On all his sorties he has displayed a fine fighting spirit pressing home his attacks with keen determination and obtaining excellent photographs of the objectives. On one occasion when attacking Cologne two of the engines of his aircraft became unserviceable. Nevertheless, showing exceptional flying skill, he brought his aircraft and crew safely back to this country. His cheerful nature and keen determination have been a great asset and set a splendid example to his squadron.

McDOUGALL, F/L Thom Ross, DFC (J8812) – Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 21 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.

Flight Lieutenant McDougall has taken part in many operational sorties since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. These include attack against Berlin, Stettin, Leipzig and other heavily defended targets. He has invariably performed his duties as squadron navigation leader in an efficient, skilful and cheerful manner, setting an inspiring example by his courage and devotion to duty.

McKENZIE, FS Stanley Allen (Can 12214A) – British Empire Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 132/45 dated 26 January 1945. Home in Endeavour, Saskatchewan; enlisted in Regina, 18 September 1939. Fitter IIE, awarded BEM on same date. Awards presented, 14 February 1948. No citation in AFRO.

Has served overseas in an operational squadron for three years and is now Non-Commissioned Officer in charge of the Servicing Flight. He has tremendous initiative and has, by his example and hard work, inspired all those who work under him. During the heat of the invasion air offensive, whilst other flights were struggling to meet their allotments, this Non-Commissioned Officer’s flight, primarily through his fine organization and example, invariably exceeded its quota, often by a considerable margin. His personal contribution towards the operational success of his squadron has been outstanding.

McKENZIE, FS Stanley Allen (Can 12214A) – Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron (No.62 Base in AFRO) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. No citation in AFRO. DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has original recommendation forwarded 31 July 1944 which notes he had spent 27 months in Canada, 30 months in UK.

This Senior Non-Commissioned Officer, through his personality and leadership, has been a tremendous asset to this unit. Always doing more than his share, he set a shining example to his crews on operational work. He has at all times set a high nature of serviceability before personal rest or comfort.

McKINLEY, F/O Harold Ernest (J24990) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 1914 in St.Alberts, Alberta; home in Canyon Creek, Alberta (mink rancher); enlisted in Edmonton, 13 April 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 28 August 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 4 December 1942), and No.10 SFTS (graduated 2 April 1943). Commissioned 1943. DFC presented 9 July 1949. No citation other than “..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy.” Public Records Office Air 2/8881 has recommendation dated 18 September 1944 when he had flown 34 sorties (166 hours 25 minutes), 26 April to 12 September 1944.

Flying Officer McKinley has completed a tour of operations on four engined bombers in an exemplary manner. Many of his sorties took him deep into Germany against such heavily defended targets as Stuttgart, Hamburg and Essen. On all occasions he displayed a fine offensive spirit and pressed home all his attacks with great determination, bringing home many excellent aiming point photographs.

Flying Officer McKinley has shown great determination to participate in all operations against the enemy, and has by his cheerfulness and courage set an excellent example to all members of this squadron. In my opinion, such a long period of skilful and efficient service fully merits an award of the non-immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

McKINNON, F/O Donald Lawrence (J39906) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945. Born 1913 in Montreal; home there (clerk); enlisted there 24 September 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 7 August 19423) and No.9 AOS (graduated 14 January 1944). Commissioned December 1943. DFC presented in Montreal, 25 November 1949. Died in Ste.Anne de Bellevue Hospital, Quebec, 20 October 1996, age 83. Obituary notice said he had been a Director of Sales, Eastern Division, Canada Packers.

This officer is a navigator of outstanding ability who has taken part in a large number of operational sorties. On many occasions when handicapped by loss of his navigational aids, his ability, courage and resourcefulness have inspired confidence in the other members of his crew. On one occasion, while still some 250 miles from his objective, all the navigation aids in Flying Officer McKinnon’s aircraft were rendered unserviceable. Nevertheless, with great skill, he guided his aircraft to the target and back. At all times this officer has accomplished his duties with determination and courage.

McLEOD, WO1 Colin (R121043) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 19 September 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2274/44 dated 20 October 1944. Born 1919 in Macleod, Alberta; home in Lethbridge; enlisted Calgary, 25 July 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 2 January 1942), No.15 EFTS (graduated 13 March 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 17 July 1942). Medal presented 26 February 1949.

This officer has an excellent operational record. He has completed many sorties including attacks on Berlin, Friedrichshafen, Essen and Frankfurt. His fine leadership and keen determination have set an excellent example to all.

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NELSON, F/O Frank Irwin (J24623) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 14 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1917 in Winnipeg; home there (accountant); enlisted there 24 April 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 7 November 1942) and No.5 AOS (graduated 19 March 1943). Commissioned 1943. Medal presented 1 February 1946. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 18 August 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (164 hours 35 minutes), 25 March to 8 August 1944.

Flying Officer Nelson has completed a tour of operations as navigator on four-engine bombers. On all his sorties the standard of navigation achieved by him was of the highest order. The excellence of his navigation inspired his crew with great confidence and was a very large contributing factor to the outstanding results attained by them. Flying Officer Nelson at all times showed great operational keenness and by his cheerful determination and excellent work set a splendid example to all navigators of this squadron.

NEWSON, S/L William Francis Montgomery (C983) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 6 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 August 1943 and AFRO 1849/43 dated 10 September 1943. Born in Calgary, 19 July 1917; home in Edmonton. Enrolled in RMC, 1936; commissioned 1939. Served in Eastern Air Command until 1942 when he was posted to England.

This officer has completed numerous operational missions and has won the admiration and respect of all the members of his squadron. His aircraft has been twice damaged by anti-aircraft fire but in spite of this he has returned to base on each occasion and effected a safe landing. Squadron Leader Newson is an ideal leader whose courage and devotion to duty have been a fine example.

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OLDERSHAW, F/O Donald McKie (J35238) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 May 1945 and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945. Home in Chatham, Ontario; enlisted there 27 May 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 18 April 1943) and No.4 AOS (graduated 3 September 1943). Medal sent by registered mail 28 June 1949.

Flying Officer Oldershaw has recently completed a most successful tour of operational duty attacking such heavily defended targets as Duisburg, Essen, Kiel and Hamburg. In August 1944, after bombing Kiel, despite the fact that this officer’s navigation equipment has been rendered unserviceable, he successfully directed his aircraft safely back to base, having memorized the course. Throughout, Flying Officer Oldershaw has displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty. His outstanding skill and keenness for operations has set a fine example to all.

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PARKS, P/O Walter Franklin (J7544) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 31 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 12 January 1943 and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Born in Verwood, Saskatchewan, 21 February 1920; home in Regina (lumber merchant); enlisted there 19 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 2 May 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 3 July 1941), and No.3 SFTS (graduated 20 September 1941). Commissioned 20 September 1941; F/O 20 September 1942; F/L 13 June 1943; S/L 24 August 1943; W/C, 1 October 1944; reverted to S/L 1 October 1946. To No.408 Squadron, April 1942; to No.50 Squadron, April 1943; OC of No.435 Squadron, April 1948. DFC and Bar presented at Buckingham Palace, 28 June 1945. Wing Commander W.F.Parks, DFC, CD (19740), killed on flying operations in UK, 17 May 1954.

This officer has participated in many operational sorties over some of the most heavily defended targets in enemy and enemy occupied territory. On one occasion when flying over Lille his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and severely damaged. With great determination he flew on and attacked his target successfully. Pilot Officer Parks’ skill and courage have been a source of inspiration to all.

PHILLIPS, P/O Wallace George (J19005) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 19 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1296/44 dated 16 June 1944. Born in Montreal, 1917; home in St.Lambert, Quebec; enlisted in Halifax, 10 October 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 13 February 1942), No.22 EFTS (graduated 24 April 1942) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 11 September 1942). Commissioned 1943. Medal sent by registered mail 11 July 1945.

This officer has completed a notable tour of operations during which he has attacked the German capital on ten occasions. He has at all times displayed exceptional ability and has set a fine example of courage and resolution.

PITU, F/L Carl Leo (J28633) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Born 1922 in Canmore, Alberta; home in Edmonton (labourer); enlisted there 26 July 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 23 January 1943), No.23 EFTS (graduated 3 April 1943) and No.11 SFTS (graduated 6 August 1943). Commissioned July 1943. Medal sent to him at Wolfe Creek, Alberta, but was returned 22 August 1949 and mailed to him in United Kingdom, 6 September 1949. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 18 April 1945 when he had completed 36 sorties (225 hours 51 minutes) between 6 October 1944 and 22 March 1945.

Flight Lieutenant Pitu has recently completed a tour of operations against the enemy on four-engined bombers. During his tour this officer participated in attacks on several of the most heavily defended targets in Germany including Chemnitz, Frankfurt and Cologne.  Flight Lieutenant Pitu has always pressed home his attacks with the greatest determination, and his keenness for operations has been an inspiration to the whole squadron. His cheerfulness and enthusiasm throughout his thirty-six sorties was consistently maintained at a very high level.  This pilot has displayed exceptional ability, and is heartily recommended for the Non-Immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

POSNER, P/O Sam Wilfred (J86477) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born 1917 in Winnipeg; home there; enlisted there 28 July 1941. Formerly in Royal Canadian Army Service Corps. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 28 February 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 11 September 1942). Commissioned 1944. Award presented in Detroit, 21 April 1950. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. Public Records Office Air 2/9026 has recommendation dated 5 July 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (169 hours eight minutes), 22 June 1943 to 23 June 1944.

Pilot Officer Posner, navigator, has completed an operational tour against the enemy from this country. He has navigated successfully to many very heavily defended targets deep in Germany, including Berlin, Nuremburg and Friedrichshaven. His standard of navigation throughout has been exemplary on all occasions and the fact that his crew reported very few enemy aircraft sightings and were seldom holed by flak is a clear indication of the excellence of his track keeping.  Pilot Officer Posner’s keenness and skill as a navigator have been a very large contribution to the high degree of success and bombing accuracy obtained by his crew during their tour. He has set a splendid example of keenness and navigational skill to all navigators on this squadron. Therefore, considering his fine operational record I recommend that he be awarded a non-immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

PRICE, P/O John Reginald (J16259) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 June 1943 and AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943. Born at Indian Head, Saskatchewan; home there; enlisted Regina 29 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 February 1941), No.2 BGS (graduated 7 July 1941), No.3 AOS (graduated 26 May 1941) and No.1 CNS (graduated 6 August 1941). Commissioned 1942. Medal presented 21 August 1949.

Since joining this squadron Pilot Officer Price has participated in numerous operational sorties over well defended enemy objectives such as Berlin, Emden, Rostock and Turin. He has led his pilot to these targets with cool judgement and determination, often securing photographs which display a fine record of achievement. One night in March 1943, while returning from Stuttgart, his aircraft was severely damaged in an encounter with an enemy fighter. Although two engines were put out of action, this officer unerringly navigated the aircraft which made a safe landing at base. His courage and devotion to duty have been outstanding.

PRICE, S/L Lyall Basil Burman (C920) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 August 1942 as per London Gazette dated 11 August 1942 and AFRO 1371/42 dated 28 August 1942. Born in Montreal, 18 April 1920; home in Quebec; enlisted Montreal 3 January 1939. Trained at Camp Borden. Commissioned 1939. Killed in flying accident, 29 July 1942 (Hampden AT113, No.408 Squadron); buried in UK.

Squadron Leader Price is a captain who has never failed to attack the most highly defended targets with the greatest determination and skill. He has set an inspiring example.

Squadron Leader Price has completed 25 operational flights as Captain of a bomber aircraft. Throughout, his courage, cheerfulness and devotion to duty have been outstanding. He has been a fine example to all aircrew in his squadron, and the results he has achieved have gone far to inspiring his fellow crews to greater efforts.  Squadron Leader Price has never failed to attack the most highly defended targets with the greatest determination and skill. He has brought back excellent photographs of the primary target taken whilst bombing, an outstanding example being that showing the actual sheds of the Heinkel Aircraft Works at Rostock which he was detailed to attack on the night of 26/27 April 1942.

PRIDDAY, P/O Robert George (J17739) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1943 and AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943. Born in Port Carling, Ontario, 1921; home there; enlisted Toronto 6 January 1941. Commissioned 1943. DFC presented by King George VI, 11 August 1944; Bar to DFC presented 24 April 1948.

This officer has flown on operations against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany. He has always displayed courage, coolness and resourcefulness under fire. On several occasions when his aircraft had developed engine trouble Pilot Officer Pridday’s skill in effecting repairs has enabled the mission to be completed successfully.

PULLAR, F/L William Stewart (J18049) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 22 August 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2274/44 dated 20 October 1944. Born 1918 at Delia, Alberta; home there (former member, Royal Canadian Artillery). Enlisted in Calgary, 19 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 April 1941), No.8 EFTS (graduated 9 June 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 20 August 1941). Commissioned 1943. Lost 15 December 1944 when a Fortress of No.168 (HT) Squadron disappeared. Medal presented to his mother, 1 December 1948.

Flight Lieutenant Pullar is a keen and efficient captain whose example of courage and resolution has been well reflected in the fine fighting spirit of his crew. He has attacked many heavily defended targets and his successes are an excellent tribute to his ability and tenacity. He has set a fine example to all.

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QUINLAN, F/O Austin Samuel (J24971) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 1919 in Toronto; home there (former member of Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted in Halifax, 4 February 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 1 August 1942), No.13 EFTS (graduated 20 November 1942), and No.16 SFTS (graduated 2 April 1943). Commissioned 1943. No citation other than “..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 6 September 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (140 hours 36 minutes), 22 March to 30 August 1944.

Flying Officer Quinlan has completed a very large number of sorties in four-engined bombers. Many of these trips took him to such heavily defended targets deep in Germany as Berlin, Stuttgart, and Hamburg. On all occasions Flying Officer Quinlan pressed home his attacks with great determination and he seldom returned without an excellent photograph of the target attacked. Throughout his tour he has displayed exceptional keenness to operate and come to grips with the enemy and by his keenness has inspired his crew and all members of the squadron.  Flying Officer Quinlan, by virtue of his fine spirit and operational ability has been a great asset to this squadron and [I] consider that his fine operational record fully warrants an award of the non-immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

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RAILTON, F/L Charles Spencer (J26609)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 1917 in Vancouver; home there (office clerk); enlisted there 26 May 1942. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.3 BGS (graduated 14 May 1943). Commissioned May 1943. Award presented in Vancouver, 22 October 1949. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation of W/C J.F. Easton dated 5 November 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (143 hours 25 minutes), 24 February to 15 October 1944. Squadron Gunnery Leader.

A skilful air gunner who has at all times displayed outstanding devotion to duty. Flight Lieutenant Railton has participated in attacks on such major targets as Berlin, Schweinfurt, Stuttgart, Essen and Dusseldorf. In all these sorties, his coolness and fine offensive spirit have been an inspiration to the other members of his crew.  Flight Lieutenant Railton’s alertness in spotting enemy fighters, and his prompt directions for evasive action have more than once saved his aircraft from destruction.  This officer’s outstanding leadership marked him for appointment as Gunnery Leader of the squadron. During the period he has held this position, his efforts in the interest of training and operational flying have been tireless.  I consider that his splendid record of achievement fully merits the award of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

RAILTON, F/L Charles Spencer, DFC (J26609)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1478/45 dated 21 September 1945. Unit identified in AFRO only as “Overseas”; proper unit identified in DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Box 2067). Another source has given unit as No.432 Squadron. DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) gives unit as No.408 Squadron and has recommendation submitted 3 February 1945, when he had served 13 months in Canada, 19 months overseas. Squadron Gunnery Leader.

A skilful air gunner who has at all times displayed outstanding devotion to duty, Flight Lieutenant Railton has been over many heavily defended targets deep in the heart of enemy territory such as Berlin, Schweinfurt, Essen, Dusseldorf and Stuttgart. On all these sorties his coolness and fine offensive spirit have been an inspiration to all members of his crew. His promptness in spotting enemy aircraft and his alertness have been responsible on many occasions for saving the aircraft from destruction. As Gunnery Leader of the squadron he has been an inspiration to one and all and he has been exceptionally competent.

REEVES, S/L Harold James (J10644)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945 and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945. Born 1919 in Toronto; home there (aircraft inspector); enlisted in Hamilton, 20 May 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 24 September 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 21 November 1941) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 13 March 1942). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 26 August 1949 at No.1 FTS, Claresholm. No citation other than “in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy”. DHist file 181.009 D.1764 (RG.24 Vol.20610) has recommendation for immediate DFC dated 23 January 1945 when he had flown 32 sorties (162 hours five minutes).

Squadron Leader Reeves has completed a tour of operations on four-engined bombers. On the night of January 14, 1945, his last sortie against the enemy prior to completing his tour, one of his engines cut prior to reaching the target, which was Grevenbroich. Although two of the remaining engines were losing power, he pressed on to the target, released his bombs and flew safely home.  Throughout his tour Squadron Leader Reeves has displayed the utmost in courage and devotion to duty. He has proven to be an exceptional pilot both in the air and on the ground and has the complete confidence of every member of the squadron. His keenness on operations and cheerful disregard for any and all defences the enemy has to offer have made him an inspiration and outstanding example to all…

REEVES, P/O Thomas Henry (J16268) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 June 1943 and AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943. Home in New Westminster, British Columbia; enlisted in Vancouver, 30 December 1940. Trained at No.7 BGS (graduated 18 August 1941) and No.2 WS (graduated 3 March 1941). Commissioned 1942; action described was 26/27 July 1942. Award presented 16 May 1945.

Pilot Officer Reeves has completed a large number of operational sorties, many of them directed against heavily defended targets such as Cologne, Essen and Bremen. As wireless operator/air gunner he has displayed commendable courage and devotion to duty. In July 1942, when returning from Hamburg, his aircraft, which had been damaged by anti-aircraft fire over the target, was attacked twice by a Junkers 88. On the second occasion Pilot Officer Reeves hit the attacking aircraft. It turned over on its back and was last seen diving steeply. Throughout his operational career this officer has invariably displayed outstanding reliability in difficult situations.

During this officer’s operational tour, as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, on Hampdens, he has shown commendable courage and devotion to duty. On the night of the 26th July 1942, when returning from Hamburg, the aircraft in which Pilot Officer Reeves was flying was very badly shot up over the target by flak. When Pilot Officer Reeves sighted a JU.88 approaching at approximately 75 yards, he opened fire just as the JU.88 opened fire. There was a second attack from the JU.88 at an approximate range of 60 yards at which time Pilot Officer Reeves again opened fire when the JU.88 was seen to turn over on its back and go down in a steep dive. It was last seen entering low clouds. The aircraft was claimed as a probable.  This officer has carried out his duties most efficiently and through showing a great interest in his work has been an inspiration to his crew members.

REICHERT, P/O Clifford Clarence (J18083)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 25 October 1919 at Thornhill, Manitoba of Austrian parents. Home in Morden, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, 21 June 1941. Posted to No.2 Manning Depot, Brandon, 21 June 1941; to No.4 ITS on 2 September 1941 (graduated 3 October 1941, although not promoted to LAC until 26 October 1941), to No.5 EFTS on 27 October 1941 (graduated 21 December 1941); to No.12 SFTS on 27 December 1941 (graduated 10 April 1942 and promoted Sergeant). Taken on strength of No.3 Personnel Reception Centre, Bournemouth, 13 May 1942; to No.12 (Pilot) Advanced Flying Unit, 21 July 1942; to No.22 OTU, 15 September 1942; promoted Flight Sergeant, 10 October 1942; to No.1659 Conversion Unit, 19 December 1942; to No.408 Squadron, 9 February 1943; promoted WO2, 10 April 1943; commissioned 11 August 1943 (backdated). Killed in action 22 June 1943 (Halifax BB375); name on Runnymede Memorial. Although no citation appears with the AFRO, a letter on DHist 181.009 D.1516 (NAC RG.24 Vol.20601) states that on the night of 21/22 June 1943 his aircraft was hit by flak. Two crewmen were killed outright. Flames swept through the nose, enveloping the cockpit where Reichert was pilot. He stayed at the controls to allow others to bale out; the aircraft exploded while he was still aboard. Evidence provided in June 1944 by P/O G.F. Pridham, who survived gravely wounded (lost a leg) and was repatriated from POW camp who wrote to the family (13 January 1944), “He was the bravest man I ever knew. He died to save my life.” The other survivor, J22511 F/O J.C.A. Russell, wrote:

Our aircraft was attacked twice by a fighter and it is probable that most of the crew members were badly injured. I was the first to leave the front hatch and immediately after baling out the aircraft exploded before anyone else had the opportunity of escaping in like fashion. The aircraft was in flames from the first attack and completely riddled with bullets. I saw no parachute open and have since heard nothing whatever of the missing members of my crew.

REID, P/O Charles Alfred (J86586)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1920 in Windsor, Ontario; home there; enlisted there 4 March 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 11 September 1941), No.7 EFTS (graduated 4 December 1942) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Commissioned May 1944. Award presented 28 June 1946. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 16 August 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (152 hours ten minutes), 26 March to 14 August 1944.

Pilot Officer Reid has completed a very large number of sorties against the enemy, many of which were to very heavily defended targets deep in the heart of Germany. On all occasions he has shown a fine offensive spirit and a great determination to come to grips with the enemy. The photographic evidence of his bombing shows unmistakably what a splendid job Pilot Officer Reid and his crew have done. Nearly all his pictures indicate that his bombs have fallen squarely on the aiming point. Pilot Officer Reid, by his keenness to operate and results achieved on operations, has set a splendid example to the whole squadron.

REINHART, Sergeant (now F/L) William Leonard (R68070/J15197)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 13 February 1942 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 358/44 dated 18 February 1944. Born Stratford, Ontario, 1916; home there (salesman); enlisted in London, Ontario, 20 June 1940. Trained at No.1 AOS (graduated 9 November 1940), No.1 BGS (graduated 23 December 1940) and No.1 ANS (graduated 20 January 1941). Later attached to RAF, US Delegation). DFM presented by King George at Buckingham Palace, 19 May 1942.

This airman has participated in many sorties including raids on Bremen, Mannheim, Hamburg and Duisburg and mine-laying operations in enemy waters. On one occasion two ships were observed near Dan Helder. One of them was attacked from a low level and direct hits were scored throughout. This airman has shown great skill and devotion to duty.

RIDGERS, F/O Cyril Frederick (J14577)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 18 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 April 194 and AFRO 1020/44 dated 12 May 1944. Born 1917; home in Hamilton, Ontario; enlisted there 26 November 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 23 May 1942) and No.2 AOS (graduated 25 September 1942). Commissioned 1942. Killed in action 26 February 1944 with this unit (Lancaster DS791); buried in Germany. Presented to next-of-kin by Governor General, 2 December 1946.

Flying Officer Ridgers has participated in very many sorties including fourteen attacks on Berlin. Throughout he has displayed a high standard of navigational ability which has been reflected in the many successes achieved. His example of keenness and devotion to duty have been highly commendable.

RITCHIE, LAC Francis Bruce (R123063)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron (No.62 Base in AFRO) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 1 August 1941. No citation in AFRO, but DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 31 July 1944; enlisted 1 August 1941; served six months in Canada, 26 months in UK.

This airman has put in many arduous hours in bombing and de-bombing aircraft, under conditions which in many cases were of an extremely trying nature. he has at all times shown an exceptional tenacity of purpose on one of the least glamorous of ground trades.

ROMANCHUK, FS (now P/O) Thomas (R212937)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 18 May 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born 1924 in Oshawa; home there. Trained at No.10 BGS. Commissioned 1945. Cited with FS Daniel Shutka (RCAF rear gunner, also DFM). DHist file 181.009 D.1764 (RG.24 Vol.200610) has recommendations for both in much greater detail. Shutka was rear gunner, Romanchuk was mid-upper gunner. Their peak achievement was on night of 1 November 1944 attacking Oberhausen. At 2042 hours Shutka saw a Me.210 attacking a Lancaster which went into corkscrew. Both gunners opened fire and the Me.210 was seen to go down in flames. One minute later they were attacked by a Me.110 which broke away when Shutka opened fire. At 2046, Romanchuk saw a Me.210 positioning itself on the port beam. Both gunner fired, hits were registered, and the enemy aircraft was last seen in flames, diving out of control. Two minutes later they were again attacked by a twin-engine fighter which broke away when Shutka fired.

As mid-upper and rear gunner respectively, Flight Sergeant Romanchuk and Flight Sergeant Shutka have participated in very many sorties against enemy targets. They have at all times displayed the greatest keenness, coupled with a high degree of skill and co-operation. On one occasion, during an attack against Oberhausen, they were responsible for the destruction of two of four enemy fighters which engaged their aircraft during the operation. Cool, resolute and devoted, these airmen have proved themselves to be most valuable members of aircraft crew.

ROSS, Flight Sergeant Allen Lawrence (R95492)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 6 April 1943 and AFRO 809/43 dated 7 May 1943. Born in Treherne, Manitoba, 1918; home in Holland, Manitoba (farmer, formerly in Royal Canadian Artillery). Trained at No.2 ITS, No.18 EFTS, and No.15 SFTS. Commissioned January 1943. Died in Holland, Manitoba, 20 December 1995.

Flight Sergeant Ross has taken part in 30 sorties against a wide variety of enemy targets. He is a fine operational captain, who invariably presses home his attacks with great determination. His skill and sound judgement have won the confidence of all with whom he has flown.

RUSSELL, Sergeant Harry Tingley (R50456)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron (No.62 Base in AFRO) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Recommendation found in DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606); Fitter/Armourer, NCO in charge of “B” Flight Armament Section. Home in Windsor, Nova Scotia; enlisted in Moncton, 10 April 1940; served eleven months in Canada, 40 months overseas.

As Senior Non-Commissioned Officer in charge of a flight, Sergeant Russell has displayed great qualities of leadership and has been of inestimable inspiration to his men. His devotion to duty over a long period has played a considerable part in the success of his squadron.

RUSSELL, S/L William Alfred (J8401)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 19 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1296/44 dated 16 June 1944. Born 1919 in London, England; home in Mount Denis, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 20 December 1940. Formerly in Governor General’s Horse Guards. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 6 June 1941), No.19 EFTS (graduated 8 August 1941) and No.10 SFTS (graduated 24 October 1941). Commissioned 1941. Invested with award by King George, 11 August 1944. Died in Toronto, 21 May 1982.

This officer has taken part in a large number of sorties, including nine attacks on the capital of the German Reich, four on Hamburg and others on the strongly defended targets of the Ruhr area. He is a gallant and skilful leader and he has contributed materially to the fine fighting qualities of the squadron. His determination and devotion to duty have been reflected in the successes obtained.

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SANDERSON, F/L William Clifford (J7331)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 158/47 dated 28 March 1947. Born in Tate, Saskatchewan, 1917; home there (school teacher). Commissioned September 1941. No DHist file found as of 2 October 1995. No training or citation in AFRO, and no explanation as to why the time lapse between London Gazette and AFRO publication. With NWAC K Flight, as S/L, when AFRO published. Retired from RCAF in 1967. Thereafter he was an avid outdoorsman (rafting anf fishing in Northwest Territories) and a supporter of the Aero Space Museum in Calgary. Died in Calgary, 16 May 1998

SARGENT, F/O John Heitmann (J36850)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945. Born 1918 in Hazelton, British Columbia; home there (store manager, formerly in Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted there 28 July 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 3 April 1943) and No.2 AOS (graduated 29 October 1943). Commissioned October 1943. Award presented 6 May 1950.

Flying Officer Sargent has displayed great courage and sound navigational ability throughout his tour of operational duty. During one mission his aircraft was attacked and damaged by a night fighter while over the target and, during the next hour and a half, seven more attacks were made. Despite the fact that the navigational aids had been rendered unserviceable and the log lost during the combat, Flying Officer Sargent navigated the bomber safely to an emergency airfield in Belgium, coolly warning his pilot of high ground and wooded areas as they flew in to make a successful crash landing.

SHARP, W/C Frederick Ralph (C858)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 May 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Born 1913 at Moosomin, Saskatchewan; home in Trenton. Served in Royal Canadian Artillery, 1934-1937; to RCAF, July 1939. Remained in postwar RCAF; graduated from National Defence College, 1966; appointed Vice-Chief of Defence Staff, 1966; Deputy Commander of NORAD, 1969; Chief of Defence Staff, 1969-1974. Died at Carrying Place, Ontario, 10 June 1992.

This officer has completed numerous sorties against many of the enemy’s most heavily defended targets and has displayed high qualities of leadership, coolness and determination. On one occasion whilst over the target with the bomb doors open, Wing Commander Sharp’s aircraft was attacked by a hostile fighter. This pilot took successful evasive action, however, and afterwards pressed home a good attack. In March 1945, Wing Commander Sharp participated in a daylight attack on Essen. Some time before the target was reached the starboard inner engine became defective. The propeller had to be feathered. Nevertheless, Wing Commander Sharp, displaying his usual tenacity, went on to press home his attack. His determination to complete his mission successfully has won much praise.

SHELLINGTON, Sergeant (now P/O) William Ralph (R84134/J18030)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943. Born in Burford, Ontario, 1920; home in Brantford (book keeper). Trained at No.1 BGS and No.1 WS. Commissioned 1943.

Sergeant Shellington has taken part in many operational sorties against some of the enemy’s major and most heavily defended targets. At all times he has shown outstanding ability as a wireless operator and a strong sense of duty. His cheerful confidence has contributed largely to the high standard and morale obtained by his crew.

SHIELDS, F/O William John (J23850)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 27 March 1945 and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born 1921 in Victoria, British Columbia; home in Cobocank [?], Ontario (clerk). Trained at No.3 ITS, No.11 EFTS and No.13 SFTS. Commissioned February 1943. No citation other than “completed… many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 6 December 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (153 hours 25 minutes), 4 July to 1 November 1944.

Flying Officer Shields has successfully completed a tour of operations against the enemy. Many of his sorties carried him over such heavily defended targets as Kiel, Sterkrade, Duisburg and Essen. Throughout his tour he has displayed a fine offensive spirit and has pressed home his attacks with exceptional determination and coolness. Flying Officer Shields, by his devotion to duty, has imparted to his crew members an esprit de corps that has been exceptional.

SHUTKA, FS (now P/O) Daniel (R160137/J94140)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 18 May 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born in Oshawa, Ontario, 1923; home in Orono, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 31 March 1942. Trained at No.10 BGS (graduated 14 January 1944). Commissioned 1945. Invested with award by King George VI, 29 June 1945. Cited with FS Thomas Romanchuk (see above for citation).

SKEBO, Sergeant Theodore Herbert (Can 4190A)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1943 and AFRO 2437/43 dated 26 November 1943. Born in Winnipeg, 1916; home there (butcher); enlisted there 12 November 1936. Invested with award by King George VI, 11 August 1944. DHist biographical file includes a long interview with him including much information on LMF problems.

Since joining this squadron Sergeant Skebo has completed numerous operational missions. Many of these have been accomplished in the face of heavy opposition and against such targets as Hamburg, Berlin and other strongly defended areas. In the capacity of flight engineer this airman has done much to ensure success on many sorties and has given material assistance in the training of new members of aircraft crew.

SMITH, S/L Charles Woodward (J8371)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 9 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 22 February 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Born Windsor, Ontario, 1919; home there; enlisted there 10 January 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 9 June 1941), No.11 EFTS (graduated 27 July 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 24 October 1941). Commissioned 1941. Award presented 27 June 1945.

This officer has completed very many sorties including attacks on most of the enemy’s well defended targets. He has invariably displayed skill and courage of a high order and his determination to achieve success has won great praise. He is a most efficient flight commander whose leadership has been most inspiring.

SMITH, S/L William John (J10553)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 30 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1916 in Wilkie, Saskatchewan; home in Victoria (ex-Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted in Halifax, 28 May 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 24 September 1941), No.3 EFTS (graduated 21 November 1941) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 13 March 1942). Commissioned March 1942. Award sent by registered mail 28 June 1949. Served in postwar RCAF.

Squadron Leader Smith has completed a large number of sorties during a tour of operations. He has always displayed a fine fighting spirit which was well demonstrated during an attack against Magdeburg in January 1945. Soon after leaving the English coast the starboard inner engine of his aircraft failed and a little later the port outer engine also failed. Although in consequence he was behind in timing and below the briefed bombing height, this officer pressed home his attack and successfully bombed the target. As a flight commander Squadron Leader Smith has displayed outstanding leadership and devotion to duty of the highest order.

SMITH, F/L William Robert (J18361)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 24 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1921 in Toronto; home there; enlisted there 22 July 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 11 April 1942), No.14 EFTS (graduated 3 July 1942) and No.10 SFTS (graduated 6 November 1942. Commissioned July 1943. Killed in action 25 February 1944 (Lancaster DS791, No.408 Squadron); buried in Germany. Award presented at Government House to next-of-kin, 7 November 1949.

This officer has completed as pilot and captain of aircraft many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.

SNIDER, F/O Donald Leonard (J19789)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born 1918 in Brantford, Ontario; home there. Former member of Royal Canadian Artillery and Bank of Montreal employee; enlisted in Hamilton or Toronto, 14 October 1941. Overseas in June 1943. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 28 February 1942), No.1 EFTS (graduated 24 April 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 28 August 1942). Commissioned 1944. Award presented 14 June 1949. No citation other than “completed… numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 8 November 1944 when he had flown 34 sorties (163 hours 25 minutes), 10 April to 26 September 1944.

Flying Officer Snider has completed an operational tour as captain in four-engined bombers. Many of these trips took him to such heavily defended targets in Germany as Karlsruhe, Friedrichshafen, Wesseling and Kiel. On all occasions, Flying Officer Snider displayed great determination in pressing home his attacks in spite of anything the enemy had to offer in the way of defences. More recently, on precision targets requiring the utmost in skill, he has bombed the target, bringing back excellent aiming point photographs. Throughout his tour he has displayed exceptional keenness in operations and coming to grips with the enemy, and by his keenness has inspired his crew and all members of the squadron.

Flying Officer Snider has, by his cheerful spirit and fine operational ability, been a great asset to this squadron, and I consider that his fine operational record fully warrants the grant of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

SOSIAK, FS John (R162332)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1917 in Transcona, Manitoba; home there; enlisted in Winnipeg, 21 April 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 1 January 1943), No.2 BGS (graduated 14 May 1943) and No.5 AOS (graduated 26 May 1943). NOTE: The latter two dates are too close together and should be checked. Award presented 13 September 1947. The following brief citation appears in the AFRO: “This airman has completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 18 August 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (140 hours five minutes), 9 April to 15 August 1944. Medals with logbook and other documents offered for sale by Gateway Militaria, Catalogue No.14 (1999 ?) for $ 750.00.

Flight Sergeant Sosiak has completed a tour of operations on four-engine bombers. During his tour he bombed many targets both in Germany and in occupied Europe in an exceptionally accurate and conclusive manner. As a bomb aimer he is outstanding. Regardless of the heaviest German defences, he always pressed home the attack and would never release his bombs unless absolutely certain that the target was in his bombsight. The accuracy of his bombing is well proven by the excellence of his photographs of tactical targets in occupied Europe. The percentage of aiming point pictures he obtained is of the highest order and he has set a standard of bombing accuracy which all crews on this squadron are trying to equal.

SPAFFORD, F/L Wyllie Hall (J14328)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 21 July 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2052/44 dated 22 September 1944. Born 23 November 1915 in Toronto, raised in Winnipeg (educated at University of Manitoba); enlisted there 6 November 1940. Trained at No.14 EFTS (graduated 19 June 1942) and No.6 SFTS (graduated 25 September 1942. Commissioned 1942. Flew with No.426 Squadron prior to posting to No.408 Squadron. In postwar RCAF with B-29s on LORAN duty, 1946-1947. As of 1 July 1956 he was a Wing Commander. Obituary notice stated that at Moose Jaw he had trained pilots for the Golden Hawks aerobatic teamand for the first Snowbirds aerobatic team. Upon retirement (1964) he worked in private business, for the Saskatchewan government and, from 1971 onwards, for the Canadian International Development Agency, assigned to Nigeria. Died in Ottawa, 20 March 1999; extensive obituary article in Ottawa Citizen of 22 March 1999. Award presented by King George VI, 11 August 1944.

This officer has displayed a high standard of skill and gallantry in air operations against the enemy. He has completed many sorties during which he has attacked such strongly defended targets as Berlin, Frankfurt and Mannheim. He has invariably pressed home his attacks with vigour and has obtained much success. He is a most inspiring leader.

SUTHERLAND, P/O Norman (J19842)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette dated 19 September 1944 and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Born 1920 in LaFleche, Saskatchewan; enlisted in Regina. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 22 May 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 28 August 1942) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 18 December 1942). Commissioned 1944. Award presented 22 April 1950. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations during which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Recommendation found in DHist file 181.009 D.1658 “Honours and Awards, Linton-on-Ouse” (PAC RG.24 Vol.1658); dated 24 June 1944 when he had flown 192 hours 52 minutes on operations (31 sorties):

Pilot Officer Sutherland has completed his first tour of operations, consisting of numerous sorties against distant and heavily defended targets. These included seven to Berlin and nine others to distant targets in southwest Germany. Throughout his past tour with the squadron, Pilot Officer Sutherland has set a very high example as an operational captain. He has carried out all his duties in a most efficient and cheerful manner, and his courage and devotion to duty have been of a very high order.

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THORSON, F/L Emil (J21186)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 1921 in Vancouver; home there (painter and carpenter); enlisted there 13 January 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 17 July 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 20 November 1942). Commissioned November 1942. Award presented 29 January 1947. No citation other than “completed …many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 6 December 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (164 hours 25 minutes), 16 April to 1 November 1944.

Flying Officer Thorson has completed a tour on heavy bombers. He has navigated over many heavily defended targets such as Kiel, Sterkrade, Duisburg and Cologne. On all occasions Flying Officer Thorson has navigated his aircraft in an exceptionally skilful manner, and several times was responsible for the safe return of the aircraft and crew back to base. Flying Officer Thorson at all times inspired his crew by his coolness in the face of danger and his efficiency in navigation.

TRUAX, F/O Clarence Windsor (J35817) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Born 1910 in Grand Forks, British Columbia; home in Vancouver (timekeeper, carpenter, trucker, formerly in COTC); enlisted there, 15 September 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 17 April 1943) and No.2 AOS (graduated 17 September 1943). Commissioned September 1943. Award presented 29 January 1947. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 6 December 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (155 hours five minutes), 15 July to 1 November 1944.

Flying Officer Truax has successfully completed a tour of operations on four-engined bombers. He navigated to many heavily defended targets such as Essen, Stuttgart, Kiel and Duisburg. On all occasions his standard of navigation has been outstanding. He has displayed exceptional keenness to participate in operations against the enemy and has been responsible for the safe return of his crew on many occasions.  Flying Officer Truax by his cheerfulness and hearty co-operation has been a shining example to his other crew members, and I therefore recommend him for the award of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

TULLY, F/O Matthew James (J20072)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 January 1945 and AFRO 625/45 dated 13 April 1945. Born 1918 in London, England; home in Fernie, British Columbia; formerly in Canadian Army; enlisted in Vancouver, 8 January 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 3 July 1942) and No.4 AOS (graduated 23 October 1942). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 6 May 1950. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 14 October 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (159 hours 40 minutes), 6 October 1943 to 13 September 1944.

Flying Officer Tully has completed a tour of operations as navigator on four-engined bombers in an exemplary manner. On many of these sorties he navigated with great accuracy to such heavily defended targets deep in Germany as Berlin, Nuremburg and Frankfurt, and on all occasions he showed a cool disregard for any defences the enemy had to offer.  As a navigator, Flying Officer Tully is exceptionally good. On all his operations his timing and track keeping were excellent, and this is well proved by the fact that the aircraft in which he flew was never attacked by fighters and seldom hit by flak.  Flying Officer Tully’s courage and skill were a great inspiration to his crew. His splendid navigation inspired them with confidence and set a fine example to all navigators on the squadron. Therefore I recommend that this officer by virtue of his long and outstanding service be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (Non-Immediate).

TUNIS, F/O William Elmer (J88131)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945. Born 1921 in Hamilton, Ontario; home there (blacksmith’s helper); enlisted there 30 August 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 18 February 1943), No.9 EFTS (graduated 18 April 1943) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 6 August 1943). Commissioned July 1944. Award presented in Hamilton, 27 July 1949.

This officer, at all times, has shown keenness and determination during his attacks on enemy targets. His aircraft, on one occasion, was so badly hit by anti-aircraft fire that he had to leave it by parachute. On another occasion, while on a daylight attack, one engine of his aircraft was damaged and later was badly hit by anti-aircraft fire but, despite these hazardous circumstances, Flying Officer Tunis flew his aircraft safely back to base. By his fine leadership and coolness this officer has always set a fine example to his squadron.

TURNOUR, FS Noel Cecil (R62270)Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 26 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1943 and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Born in Alberta; home in Vancouver (student); enlisted in Saskatoon. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 15 November 1940), No.12 EFTS (ceased training, 2 January 1941), No.5 AOS (graduated 26 April 1941), No.4 BGS (graduated 7 June 1941) and No.1 CNS (graduated 8 July 1941). Award presented 20 March 1944.

Flight Sergeant Turnour has taken part in attacks on most of the principal targets in Germany and German occupied territory and has also participated in many successful mining operations. One night in August 1942 he was a member of the crew of an aircraft detailed to attack Kassel. On the outward journey the aircraft was attacked by a Junkers 88. After a hard battle the enemy bomber was shot down and Flight Sergeant Turnour navigated his aircraft to the target which was bombed successfully. Throughout, this airman’s zeal, courage and outstanding work have been an example to all and his cool confidence and determination have always been of the highest order.

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VAN DEN BOK, F/O Ralph (83004)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942. Born in Dulwich, 1906; home in Byflet. Commissioned 1940. Shot down over Belgium, 28/29 August 1942 in W/C Twigg’s aircraft (Hampden AE197). Escaped with F/L G.C. Fisher and regained Gibraltar (reported in Squadron Operational Record Book, 2 October 1942. No citation to DFC published; following text appeared in Air Ministry Bulletin 7711.

This officer has participated in numerous sorties against heavily defended targets, including attacks on Mannheim, Duisburg, Huls, Bremen, Kiel and Hamburg. He was the wireless operator/air gunner of a Hampden aircraft which participated in a low level attack on the Scharnhorst during the battleship’s escape from Brest. The aircraft was extensively damaged, including the wireless equipment, by the battleship’s defensive fire. Skilfully effecting repairs, Flying Officer Van den Bok re-established communication with his base, rendering valuable assistance in the safe return of aircraft.

His devotion to duty is such that, during the time he was detached from the squadron on a course he asked for 48 hours leave in order to take part in his squadron’s activities against Rostock. As squadron Signals Officer, Flying Officer Van den Bock has been mainly responsible for the high standard of work performed by the wireless operators of the squadron.

VAN DEN BOK, F/O Ralph (83004)Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 November 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 7711 refers. Cited with F/L G.C. Fisher (RCAF);

In August 1942, Flight Lieutenant Van Den Bok and Flight Lieutenant Fisher were wireless operator air gunner and navigator, respectively, of an aircraft detailed to attack Saarbrucken. On the return flight the bomber was attacked by enemy aircraft, sustaining much damage. Flight Lieutenant Van Den Bok, who was wounded in the leg by a piece of shrapnel, and Flight Lieutenant Fisher displayed outstanding courage, determination and fortitude. Both have completed many sorties and have invariably displayed similar qualities.  NOTE: Recommended 28 October 1942 when he had flown 25 sorties (DHist file 181.009 D.2617, in National Archives of Canada RG.24 Volume 20627). Text is more detailed than that published:

Since the beginning of his tour on operations, 22 August 1941, Flying Officer Van den Bok has taken part in 25 sorties over enemy territory against very heavy enemy defences. Targets he has attacked are such as Duisburg, Essen, Bremen, Mannheim, Hamburg, Dusseldorf (twice), Huls, Cologne, Rostock, Flensberg.  On his last trip to Saarbrucken, 28 August 1942, on returning from the target he was attacked by enemy aircraft and shot down over Belgium. He sustained a wound in his leg on the entry of a piece of flak and despite physical suffering due to his wounded leg he was able to travel some 3,000 miles [sic] through enemy territory to escape capture and arrived in Gibraltar in less than three weeks.

Under a calm and quiet manner he has a fine offensive spirit in action which inspires confidence in his fellow aircrew.

VAUGHAN, P/O Edward Gerrard (J86685)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1923 in Swansea, Wales; home in Vancouver or Cumberland, British Columbia; enlisted Vancouver 25 February 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 11 September 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 15 April 1943). Commissioned May 1944. Award presented 29 January 1947. No citation other than “completed…numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 18 August 1944 when he had flown 34 sorties (158 hours), 26 March to 14 August 1944.

Pilot Officer Vaughan has completed a tour of operations on four-engine bombers in an exemplary manner. His sorties took him to many heavily defended targets, such as Nuremburg, Essen and Karlsruhe, deep in Germany. On every occasion Pilot Officer Vaughan displayed fine offensive spirit and pressed home all his attacks with great determination. He brought back many splendid pictures of the aiming points attacked, and has proved to all that he is an operational pilot of outstanding ability.

VOGAN, F/O Raymond Ross (J27576)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1945 and AFRO 625/45 dated 13 April 1945. Born 1910 in Carrick, Ontario; home there (farmer); enlisted Ottawa 9 May 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 30 December 1942) and No.7 AOS (graduated 25 June 1943). Commissioned 1943. Award presented 30 May 1947. No citation other than “completed… numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 4 November 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (160 hours ten minutes), 1 May to 12 September 1944.

Flying Officer Vogan has completed a tour of operations as navigator on four engined bombers in an exemplary manner. He has navigated his aircraft with exceptional accuracy to such heavily defended targets in Germany as Sterkrade, Kiel, Stuttgart and Hamburg, and has on all occasions shown a complete disregard of any defences the enemy had to offer. As a navigator, Flying Officer Vogan has stood out as one of the best the squadron has had, and his coolness and cheerful disregard of any dangers in operations has inspired his crew with complete confidence in his skill. He has, by his accuracy in timing and track keeping, set a fine example to all navigators in the squadron. Therefore I recommend that by virtue of this officer’s outstanding service, he be awarded the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

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WALLACE, F/O Bruce Carling (J35878)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Home in Mimico, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 20 April 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 20 March 1943), No.20 EFTS (graduated 15 May 1943) and No.13 SFTS (graduated 3 September 1943). Award sent by registered mail 21 December 1949. No citation other than “completed… numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.2818 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 22 March 1945 when he had flown 31 sorties (166 hours 50 minutes) from 7 August 1944 to 5 January 1945.

Flying Officer Wallace has completed a tour of operations as a pilot against the enemy on four engined bombers. He has had many sorties deep into enemy territory and flown over such heavily defended targets as Hanover, Duisburg, Darmstadt, Kiel and Dusseldorf in a most exemplary manner. He has at all times pressed home his attacks, regardless of what the enemy had to offer, and returned with many fine photographs of enemy targets.  This officer’s fine operational record and his long, outstanding service to the squadron are worthy of the highest praise…

WARD, P/O Frederick James (J88866)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Home in North Portal, Saskatchewan; enlisted Toronto, 2 April 1940. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 7 December 1942) and No.3 BGS (graduated 11 June 1943). Presented 18 October 1947.

Pilot Officer Ward has consistently displayed high qualities of courage and ability. As air gunner he has taken part in numerous sorties, including attacks on such heavily defended targets as Berlin, Stuttgart and Kiel. On one occasion, whilst over Acheres, his aircraft was attacked by several enemy aircraft. Coolly and skilfully, Pilot Officer Ward directed the necessary combat manoeuvres and, in the ensuing fights, shot down one of the attackers. His excellent work contributed materially to the safe return of his aircraft to this country. Pilot Officer Ward is a most vigilant and resolute gunner.

WHITTLES, F/O Harold Melvyn (J40060)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 30 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Home in Sudbury; enlisted in North Bay, Ontario, 5 August 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 8 August 1943) and No.2 AOS (graduated 23 December 1943). Award presented in North Bay, 23 January 1953.

Flying Officer Whittles has completed a tour of operational sorties which have included attacks on such targets as Cologne, Wessel and Hamburg. During of the missions to Dusseldorf, a Focke Wulf 190 was engaged and destroyed with his co-operation. On another occasion Flying Officer Whittles flew most of the way to the target and during the entire flight home without oxygen. In spite of extremely adverse weather he displayed exceptional skill in navigation and the target was bombed on time. Courage, determination and devotion to duty which this officer has always shown have been outstanding.

WILBY, F/O Clifford (C19932)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 13 July 1940. Award presented 11 June 1949. No citation other than “completed… numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty”. DHist file 181.009 D.2818 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 18 March 1943 when he had flown 44 sorties (253 hours 40 minutes) in two blocks – 23 January to 24 June 1943 (24 trips, 133 hours 45 minutes) and 30 October 1944 to 11 March 1945 (20 sorties, 127 hours 55 minutes) as a flight engineer.

Flying Officer Wilby has recently completed his second operational tour. Throughout his long period of operations, this officer has displayed the utmost in skill, determination and courage, and he has participated in attacks on practically all the important German targets. At all times he has proved himself to be an excellent crew member, and s source of strength to his Section Leader…

WILLIAMS, F/L David John (J6991)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 5 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 26 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Born in Vancouver, 6 January 1919; home there; enlisted there 24 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 30 March 1941), No.8 EFTS (graduated 15 May 1941), and No.3 SFTS (graduated 20 August 1941). Commissioned on graduation; Flying Officer and Flight Lieutenant, 20 August 1942; Squadron Leader, 5 August 1943; Wing Commander, 26 July 1944. Reverted to Squadron Leader, 1 October 1946; Wing Commander, 1 January 1950; Group Captain, 1 July 1956. Posted overseas immediately after earning wings; further trained at No.140 OTU, Cottsmore (October 1941 to January 1942). With No.408 Squadron, February to October 1943; the incident that brought his DFC was 27/28 August 1943 (one Ju.88 destroyed, on Hampden “K”, P1166, with FS N.C. Turnour, Sergeant L.S. Leech and Sergeant M.P. Hall). At RCAF Overseas Headquarters, November 1942 to April 1943. With No.410 Squadron, 31 May to July 1943 (organizing intruder flight); to No.54 OTU, July and August 1943. With No.406 Squadron, 25 August 1943 to 18 November 1944. With No.5 OTU, Abbotsford, February 1945 to June 1946. On staff of Materiel Command Headquarters, July 1946 to March 1947. Attended Empire Test Pilot School. March to December 1947; at Winter Experimental Establishment, Watson Lake, December 1947 to September 1949. To RCAF Staff College, Toronto, September 1949 to June 1950. On strength of Canadian Joint Staff, Washington, June 1950 to June 1952 (attached to Strategic Air Command units); at AFHQ/VCAS, June 1952 to January 1956; No.1 (F) OTU, Chatham, January to May 1956; No.1 (F) Wing, August 1956 to July 1959; CO of Station Trenton, August 1956 to July 1963; with Northern NORAD Region Headquarters, North Bay, July 1963 to August 1965. Seattle Sector, NORAD, August 1965 to 1968. Aerial victories as follows: 27/28 September 1942, one Ju.88 destroyed; 19/20 March 1944, one He.177 destroyed off Guernsey (F/O C.J. Kirkpatrick, observer); 29/30 April 1944, two Do.217s destroyed; 21 July 1944, one Do.217 destroyed alone and one Do.217 destroyed (shared). Also claimed two locomotives, two vehicles and five other targets. Photo PL-28197 shows him beside a Beaufighter nose; PL-29535 with Kirkpatrick beside their Mosquito, “Blackie and Kirk”. DFC presented at Buckingham Palace, 7 February 1943.

This officer has participated in bombing attacks against many of the enemy’s important heavily defended targets. One night in August 1942 he was captain of an aircraft detailed to attack Kassel. On the outward flight his aircraft was intercepted by a Junkers 88. By skilful tactics Flight Lieutenant Williams enabled his gunners to deliver effective bursts at the attacking aircraft, setting one of its engines on fire. It then dived steeply towards the ground where on impact it exploded. Although his own aircraft had sustained damage, Flight Lieutenant Williams pressed on to his target and bombed it. On the return journey a Messerschmitt 109 was encountered and driven off by a well directed burst of fire. Throughout, this officer has displayed a great determination to complete his allotted task. He has at all times won the confidence of all with whom he has flown.

WOOD, P/O Ernest Henry (J19016)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 6 June 1944 and AFRO 1660/44 dated 4 August 1944. Trained at No.4 ITS and No.2 AOS. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/8780 has recommendation dated 23 February 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (185 hours).

Pilot Officer Wood has nearly completed his first operational tour which has included numerous attacks against Berlin and other distant targets. As a navigator, he has performed his duties with great skill and has at all times set an excellent example by his keenness and devotion to duty. On several occasions their aircraft has been subjected to harrowing experiences, but Pilot Officer Wood by his coolness and skilful directions to his captain, on each occasion permitted the aircraft to return safely to this country.

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YOUNG, F/L David Bryson (J14819)Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 12 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 17 December 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 4 July 1942), No.2 BGS (graduated 29 August 1942) and No.1 AOS (graduated 23 October 1942). Award presented 29 January 1947. Photo PL-19951 is a crew portrait of Sergeant D.C. Sheppard (Regina), F/O D.B. Young, Sergeant H.L. Grayson (London, Ontario), Sergeant D. Beynton (Abbotsford, British Columbia), F/L H.T. Miles (Toronto), Sergeant P.M. Hughes (Lackpool, Lancashire) and F/O J.E. Marier (Toronto); PL-22906 shows Flight Sergeant Allan Earle (Winnipeg) and F/O Young visiting an orphage “adopted” by the squadron; PL-22907 shows Young alone (same occasion). No citation other than “completed …numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1941 (RG.24 Vol.20612) has recommendation dated 6 June 1945 when he had flown 31 sorties (182 hours 55 minutes), 24 June 1943 to 25 August 1944, apparently with a gap between 29 July 1943 and 7 October 1943 (first part of tour on Halifax bombers, latter part on Lancasters). Within the Lancaster period there is another gap between 24 March 1944 and 6 July 1944. The oddest part is that, although a bomb aimer, he flies six sorties as a mid-upper gunner, 18 July to 28 July 1944.

This officer has completed a very large number of sorties against some of the most heavily defended and most deeply situated targets in Germany. At all times he has displayed a fine offensive spirit and has pressed home his attacks to the fullest extent. His skill as a Bomb Aimer is proven by the large number of exemplary aiming point photographs obtained by him.

Throughout his long tour of operations Flight Lieutenant Young provided cheerful and extremely efficient leadership and thereby won the respect and admiration of all personnel association with him. It is my considered opinion that this long record of fruitful and courageous service should be rewarded with an award of the D.F.C.

YOUNG, WO Gordon Stuart (R9944)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 January 1944 and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Home in Regina, Saskatchewan; enlisted there 24 June 1938. Armourer. Photo PL-19096 shows him as a patient in one of No.6 Group’s station hospitals (bad cold).

YOUNG, WO Gordon Stuart (Can 9944)Mention in Despatches – No.408 Squadron (now No.402 Squadron) – Mention in Despatches – Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.

YOUNG, WO Gordon Stuart (Can 9944)Croix de Guerre with Bronze Star (France) – No 408 Squadron – Awarded as per AFRO 485/4 dated 12 September 1947 and Canada Gazette dated 20 September 1947.

 

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8 thoughts on “1941 – 1946”

  1. Hey,
    I am in procession of pictures of the crasht Hadley Page Hampden EQ A registration AE 438.
    The plane crashed in Belgium in November 1941 at Etelhem Westkerke.
    I like to send them to the association,kan i have a email adres to do so.
    Thx
    Van landeghem guido

  2. Just wanted to thank whoever is in charge of all the data on this website.

    I’m researching my grandfather F/O Kenneth Edward Lussier, and this site has some great information about his service. Along with a picture i’ve never seen before.

    Would there be any other pictures around that might not be shown?

    1. Richard Rowntree, June 9, 2014 at 1:34 pm
      While researching his grandfather F/O Kenneth Edward Lussier on our website Richard found “some great information about his service, a picture he had never seen before”, and expressed his thanks to “whoever is in charge of all the data on this website”. Richard I don’t know who is responsible for including all the wonderful pictures but everyone needs to know that Norman Campbell Webmaster/Administrator deserves all the credit for the content and survival of the 408 Goose Squadron Association Site.

      This is how Richard found the information, Honours and Awards, Personnel, 1941-1946. Overview- Letter “L” and this is the information he discovered.
      LUSSIER, Sergeant (now F/O) Kenneth Edward (R204124/J85500) – Mention in Despatches – No. 408 Squadron – Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945.
      Born 1924 in Ottawa; home there (clerk). Trained at No.9 BGS. Commissioned April 1944. Served in postwar RCAF; killed on flying operations, 25 April 1952, 20428
      Flight Lieutenant K.E. Lussier, DFC
      Recommendation for a Non-Immediate DFC dated 5 April 1945 when he was a Flying Officer with No. 420 Squadron. He had by then flown 32 sorties (206 hours, 45 minutes), with two trips on 24 February 1944 and 25 February 1944; the balance were 4 November 1944 to 25 March 1945. This officer has participated in 32 operational sorties which included some very heavily defended targets such as Schweinfurt, Augsburg, Karlsruhe, Hanover, Saarbrucken, Magdeburg, Essen, Cologne, Hamburg, Munster and Chemnitz.
      Wile on his second trip to Augsburg, February 25th, 1944, his crew ran into trouble near the target.
      One engine failed going into the target, the second one failed coming out and when over France, the third engine failed.
      This officer bailed out with the other members of the crew and evaded the enemy for some days, finally making contact with the Marquis, returning to England after a month in enemy territory. He was crewed up again and completed his tour of operations with 420 Squadron.
      Updated 408 Squadron Wartime Casualty List
      February 25th, 1944 W R Chorley Bomber Command Losses of WWII, 1944 Volume 5. Lancaster Mk. II DS845 EQ-T. Operation Augsburg, engines began to fail, aircraft abandoned near Abbeville France.
      Flight Sergeant Pilot, Fillion P E, RCAF, Prisoner of War
      Flying Officer Navigator, Hetherington EA, RCAF, Prisoner of War
      Flight Sergeant Air Bomber, Barnlund RE, RCAF, Evaded
      Pilot Officer Wireless Operator Air Gunner, Bockus AW, RCAF, Prisoner of War
      Sergeant Air Gunner R204124, Lussier K E, RCAF, Evaded
      Sergeant Air Gunner, Thorvardson S, RCAF, Prisoner of War
      Sergeant Flight Engineer, Gigg RP, RAF, Prisoner of War

      Richard, unable to locate the picture but hopefully you will let us know where you found the photo.

      George R McKillop
      New Westminster, BC

      1. George,

        I did have more luck while searching the web. I found about 5 more photos of my grandfather and crew while he was on a Halifax bomber.

  3. Cathy Mould
    Talked to Del B and Norm C. Apparently coding was the problem with Gord’s DFC
    the information was there all the time but we were unable to view it. suggest you compare whats on the Site with your information. Hopefully everything is in order.
    Del has great plans for photos, Norm C has your photos and is considering how to display display them.

    They are both extremely busy otherwise you would have heard from Del.
    George R McKillop
    Burnaby BC.
    george_mck@shaww.ca

  4. Hello,
    It has been a while since I last spoke to you but as I was going through your site I noticed that F/L Gordon Clayton Fisher was not mentioned as having received the Distinguished Flying Cross … would you like me to email you the information related to his award so that it can be put on the website? Also, I guess you haven’t had time to put the pictures of the grave sites that Randy and I took for you. As an aside, I have put together a book on Gord and his efforts during the war. I don’t know if you might be interested in seeing the pdf version of it but if you are please email me.

    thanx
    cathy

    1. Hi Cathy,

      My name is Dr. Audrey Swift, and I’m contacting you today from the Manitoba Follow-up Study at the Medical School of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba. We have on file that you are the niece of the late Mr. Gordon Clayton Fisher, (b.2 October 1913, d.4 April 1988).

      You may be wondering how we know your uncle. The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) is one of the longest ongoing studies of health and aging in the world. It began in 1948, and we have been following the same group of Royal Canadian Air Force recruits (of which your uncle was one) for the past 68 years. To date there are still approximately 250 study members alive, at an average age of 95. For more information on the study, please check us out on the web at http://www.mfus.ca .

      Unfortunately, the information we have on file on your uncle remains incomplete. What we would like to do now is to complete and close his file, so that his information can be entered into our databases, and used for further research. Ideally we would like to ask you about his later years. With your help, I’m certain we’ll be able to fill in the blanks.

      Many thanks for your time and consideration of this. If you think you can help us out, we’d love to hear from you. My contact information appears below.

      Best regards,

      Dr. Audrey Swift
      The Manitoba Follow-up Study (www.mfus.ca)
      Department of Community Health Sciences
      Max Rady College of Medicine | Rady Faculty of Health Sciences
      University of Manitoba
      P218 Pathology Building
      750 Bannatyne Avenue
      Winnipeg MB R3E 0W3
      Phone: 204.789-3667
      Email: Audrey.Swift@umanitoba.ca

    2. Hi Cathy,

      I’m not sure whether you received my previous email, so I’m trying again…

      My name is Dr. Audrey Swift, and I’m contacting you today from the Manitoba Follow-up Study at the Medical School of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba. We have on file that you are the grand-niece of the late Mr. Gordon Clayton Fisher, (b.2 October 1913, d.4 April 1988).

      You may be wondering how we know your great uncle. The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) is one of the longest ongoing studies of health and aging in the world. It began in 1948, and we have been following the same group of Royal Canadian Air Force recruits (of which your great uncle was one) for the past 68 years. To date there are still approximately 250 study members alive, at an average age of 95. For more information on the study, please check us out on the web at http://www.mfus.ca .

      Unfortunately, the information we have on file for your great uncle remains incomplete. What we would like to do now is to complete and close his file, so that his information can be entered into our databases, and used for further research. Ideally we would like to ask you about his later years. With your help, I’m certain we’ll be able to fill in the blanks.

      Many thanks for your time and consideration of this. If you think you can help us out, we’d love to hear from you. Even if you can’t help us out, please let us know that too, and we won’t keep trying to contact you. My email address is Audrey.Swift@umanitoba.ca and my office phone number is 1-204-789-3667.

      Best regards,
      Dr. Audrey Swift
      Research Associate
      Manitoba Follow-up Stud(www.mfus.ca).

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